Monopoly Streets



Great video game version of this classic board game.

What parents need to know

Positive messages

While one could argue that Monopoly rewards greed, it's obviously just a game. And the true lessons behind it are ones about strategy and money management.

Positive role models

The host, Mr. Monopoly, is a thorough explain-er of the rules. And while he jokes with players and jabs at them a bit verbally, he's also sympathetic -- even saying "sorry" when someone loses.

Ease of play

The rules of Monopoly can be a bit complicated for young kids to remember, but they're all clearly explained, step-by-step, in this version. Plus, you can alter and modify the rules in so many different ways here, that if you don't like a certain rule, you probably don't have to follow it.

Violence & scariness
Not applicable
Not applicable

This is a video game version of the popular classic board game by Hasbro. The Hasbro logo appears prominently in the game and on its packaging. Ads for other Hasbro-based video games appear within the packaging as well.

Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that Monopoly Streets is a new 3-D video game version of the classic board game. There is nothing more problematic or objectionable here than there would be in the original board game, with the possible exception of short-shorts on one female avatar. Be aware, though, that both the PS3 and Xbox 360 versions offer live voice chat with their online play. Common Sense Media does not recommend moderation-free online communication for pre-teens. We suggest using the parental controls built into the game console to disable online communication features.

Parents say

Not yet rated
Review this title!

What's it about?

MONOPOLY STREETS is a new video game version of the classic real-estate trading board game (the last of which was released only two years ago). But this new one allows you to play with fully animated avatars in a three-dimensional city. The gameplay holds true to the board game, but you will actually get to see your characters zipping along 3-D streets and erecting houses and hotels. You can choose to play on an old-school flat board, too, if you want. Another big feature is the ability to change the rules in myriad ways. There are so many different permutations that you can basically craft the rules to your whim.

Is it any good?


If you're a fan of the board game, you will love Monopoly Streets. The three-dimensional graphics are a hoot (watching an avatar hop around in the giant shoe, say, or seeing one surf along on the iron); and Mr. Monopoly makes for a very charming and likable host. The many, many ways in which you can customize your game mean that pretty much anyone (even those people who've always hated Monopoly because it's too long) can find a way to play that's appealing to them. One highlight is the property auctions, during which all four players frantically raise and lower their bids until time is called and the highest bidder gets the deed. There's an entire strategy to those auctions alone, in which you may not actually want to spend your money on a property, but force your opponents to overspend instead. Monopoly, as a board game, always flirts with becoming dull or repetitive, but in this video game format, it feels fresh and exciting.

Online interaction: Online play is available on all three consoles. With PS3 or Xbox 360, unmoderated voice chat can be a part of that online experience, so that kids could hear things they shouldn't. Parents don't have to allow this option and can disable it by using parental controls on their consoles.

Families can talk about...

  • Families can talk about budgeting money in real life. In the game, if you spend your money too fast, you'll run into problems. How can you apply this lesson to real life?

  • Families can also talk about the concept of "house rules." This version of Monopoly allows you to change the rules as you see fit. Does this amount to cheating? What if everyone playing agrees on the rule changes?

Game details

Platforms:Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Nintendo Wii
Available online?Available online
Developer:Electronic Arts
Release date:November 4, 2010
ESRB rating:E for no descriptors

This review of Monopoly Streets was written by

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are conducted by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.


Our star rating assesses the media's overall quality.

Find out more

Learning ratings

  • Best: Really engaging; great learning approach.
  • Very Good: Engaging; good learning approach.
  • Good: Pretty engaging; good learning approach.
  • Fair: Somewhat engaging; OK learning approach.
  • Not for Learning: Not recommended for learning.
  • Not for Kids: Not age-appropriate for kids; not recommended for learning.

Find out more

About our buy links

When you use our links to make a purchase, Common Sense Media earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes. As a nonprofit organization, these funds help us continue providing independent, ad-free services for educators, families, and kids while the price you pay remains the same. Thank you for your support.
Read more

See more about how we rate and review.

About Our Rating System

The age displayed for each title is the minimum one for which it's developmentally appropriate. We recently updated all of our reviews to show only this age, rather than the multi-color "slider." Get more information about our ratings.

Great handpicked alternatives

  • Classic board games and variations transfer well.
  • Mighty mini-game collection with loads of ways to play.
  • 100 very short, goofy mini-games. Some fun, some less so.
  • Clue-like game provides great family entertainment.

For kids who love playing with others

What parents and kids say

See all user reviews

Share your thoughts with other parents and kids Write a user review

A safe community is important to us. Please observe our guidelines

Teen, 13 years old Written bykiyannabhoo November 8, 2010

perfect for all ages

love it
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
Kid, 11 years old December 1, 2010

for old and young

What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
Teen, 13 years old Written bynayshababeey November 10, 2010


Did our review help you make an informed decision about this product?

Special Needs Guide