Pony Friends 2

Game review by
Christopher Healy, Common Sense Media
Pony Friends 2 Game Poster Image
Very similar to the original, but still a great pet sim.

Parents say

age 14+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

age 10+
Based on 3 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

Positive messages abound, including lessons on responsibility, caring for an animal, budgeting money, the importance of practice and training, appreciation for nature and wildlife, and helping out neighbors in need.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The game requires you to behave in admirable ways -- caring for your ponies, completing tasks for townsfolk, etc.

Ease of Play

The methods used for both riding your horse and making it perform tricks are simple to learn and easy to pull off.

Violence & Scariness
Language
Consumerism

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Pony Friends 2 is an exceptional virtual pet game with many great lessons for players to pick up on. It is worth noting, however, that Pony Friends 2 is very, very similar to the original Pony Friends game. There are only a handful of new features -- which frankly, may be enough for kids who loved the original.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 10 year old Written byskylin May 7, 2010

i love

i fun to play.
Parent of a 16 year old Written bykk1 April 30, 2010
i love it
Kid, 11 years old December 4, 2011

Is it worth it?

is it a good game? is $20 worth it? how many horses can you own?
Kid, 10 years old March 23, 2011
This is a fun game!!! There is a little bit of information about horses. You can feed, wash, play, and go horse back riding in this game! Lots of fun!!

What's it about?

In PONY FRIENDS 2, you'll move onto a horse ranch, buy a pony, and get tutored on how to care for that pony by a stablehand who looks like Joe Jonas. You'll groom, wash, feed, and pet your pony, as well as give it medicine when needed. You teach her tricks -- which you can use when performing in trick challenges -- and take her for rides along numerous wilderness trails. You can enter your horse in races, take photographs of animals you spot while on your rides, and check the bulletin board at the local Pony Club to see if any townsfolk need tasks performed ("quests" can be anything from finding a lost object to snapping a pic of a particular forest creature). As you earn money, you can buy new accessories for your pony -- or buy new ponies. If your stable is too full, you can always donate a pony to charity.

Is it any good?

Pony Friends 2 is a superb example of the virtual pet/animal simulation genre. The game looks great, the controls are simple, and there's enough depth and variety to keep kids interested in playing for a long time. The ability to design your own horse, from the style of its mane to the color and patterns of its hide, is a very nice creative touch. Kids who are collectors can feed their completionist tendencies with the ongoing animal-photography quest. There's a competitive aspect in the races and trick challenges, but it's never hyped up or made to be the central goal of the game. It's even wonderful the way you can take your rides at your own pace -- if you want to gallop along a trail and hurdle fences and fallen logs, you can; if you want to meander along and stop to take in the sights, you can do that too. There's a serene quality to Pony Friends that you rarely find in other video games. This sequel's only real flaw is that it may be a bit too similar to its predecessor.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the responsibilities of pet ownership. Ponies have long been considered dream pets for many children. If you really had a pony that you had to take care of, how would it compare to caring for a dog, cat, fish, hamster, or other more traditional pet? After playing the game, would you still want the responsibility of caring for a real horse?

Game details

For kids who love caring for animals

Our editors recommend

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