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Rage 2

Game review by
Paul Semel, Common Sense Media
Rage 2 Game Poster Image
Engaging yet bloody mature post-apocalyptic punk shooter.

Parents say

age 2+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

The player uses violence to get what they want, and steals indiscriminately from people she's killed, all in the name of revenge. But it's not just personal revenge; it's revenge for all the people the bad guy has hurt or will hurt in the future if he isn't stopped.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The hero's driven by revenge, and uses violence to enact it. But this revenge is against someone who's harming many other people. The hero also helps other people in need, but also takes things that don't belong to them, even though these are things they need to get revenge against the villain.

Ease of Play

The controls will be familiar to fans of the shooter genre, though newcomers will feel it has a steep learning curve. The game also boasts four difficulty settings, including a super difficult one called "Nightmare."

Violence

Players use a variety of guns and explosives, as well as a throwable weapon, to kill tons of people, resulting in tons of blood, gore, and dismemberment, along with graphic sound effects. Players can also run people over with their car.

Sex

Some female enemies are wearing sports bras and low-cut tank tops, though none are especially revealing. There are also some men dressed in similar attire, or just in short shorts. There are references to sexual situations in the dialogue, though nothing's shown during play.

Language

Numerous instances of swearing in the dialog, including multiple instances of, and variations on, "s--t" and "f--k." 

Consumerism

Sequel to 2011's Rage.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

There are some bars in the game, and tons of empty beer and wine bottles. People are shown drinking, and some bar patrons are clearly drunk.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Rage 2 is a violent first-person shooter for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and Windows PCs. Using a variety of guns and explosives, as well as a boomerang-like weapon, players have to kill a ton of people, resulting in blood, gore, and dismemberment, along with equally graphic sound effects. Gamers can run people over in vehicles, resulting in bodies (and limbs) being tossed around the screen. The dialog is also full of curse words — including numerous variations of "f--k" and "s--t" -- as well as references to sexual situations. There are also some bars in the game, complete with drunken patrons and people drinking, while numerous empty beer and wine bottles can be found throughout the world.

User Reviews

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What's it about?

Set after the events of the first game, RAGE 2 casts you as a male or female survivor trying to squeeze out a living from what remains after a meteor turns Earth into a Mad Max-like wasteland. When a militant group known as The Authority wipes out your hometown and kills your aunt, you have to do what you must to get revenge…or die trying. Players wander the wasteland, shooting bad guys and mutants, and gathering supplies, in hopes of becoming strong enough to take on The Authority and their tyrannical leader. Fortunately, gamers will have access to a range of superpowers thanks to their high tech armor, which lets them do things like fling enemies far away, or dash out of incoming fire. They'll also use a powerful dune buggy to take on the wastelands, blasting raiding parties from afar. Good luck out there -- you'll need it.

Is it any good?

Though there are a lot of open-world, post-apocalyptic shooters, this one distinguishes itself by giving players Jedi-like powers and having a looser, slightly more cartoonish feel. Like the first game, Rage 2 is set in the ashes of what remains after a meteor turned the world into a Max Mad-like wasteland full of mutants, desperate survivors, and driving enthusiasts. Using a variety of weapons and explosives, including a sharp boomerang-like throwing weapon, you have to do what you do in every open world shooter: complete missions, run errands, and gather supplies so you can strengthen yourself enough to take on the bad guy who killed your aunt and destroyed your hometown.

What sets this apart from such similar and recent games as Days Gone and Far Cry New Dawn is that you also have some Jedi-like powers that can send enemies flying, destroy their armor, or briefly pump you full of adrenaline. There's also more vehicular manslaughter, which is made easier by having cars with mounted machine guns instead of guns you have to hold while steering. More importantly, the game also has a slightly cartoonish and punk rock approach that gives it a looser tongue in cheek appeal, which makes it feel fresher and different. Similarly, your enemies are often frantic, acrobatic, and unpredictable, with some also sporting heavy armor or the ability to become invisible, all which keeps you on your toes. Rage 2 does have some issues, technical and otherwise; for example, you have to look at a ladder just right before you can climb it. Also, some bad guys don't understand that they can't walk through tables, which makes them sitting ducks because they're not smart enough to go around furniture. But, overall, Rage 2 manages to stand out in a crowded post-apocalyptic wasteland full of freaks and killers.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about violence in video games. Is the impact of the violence in Rage 2 affected by the fact that you're killing mutants as well as humans? Is the impact intensified because people can be killed instead on only attacking monsters? Does attacking mutants make the violence more acceptable?

  • The hero in Rage 2 is driven by a noble purpose, but also by revenge, but do you think this is a good idea or motivation for action? Does the quest for revenge make the hero just as bad as the villain?

Game details

Themes & Topics

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