Redout: Lightspeed Edition

Game review by
Paul Semel, Common Sense Media
Redout: Lightspeed Edition Game Poster Image
Amusing fast-paced racer for futuristic speed demons.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

Driving carefully is as important as driving fast.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Players do what they must to win, but no character development otherwise.

Ease of Play

Simple controls, easy to learn, but competition is fierce.

Violence & Scariness

While vehicles can be destroyed, there's no blood, gore.

Language

Online chat isn't moderated.

Consumerism

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Redout: Lightspeed Edition is a futuristic racing game that's safe for almost all ages. While players can use EMPs and other devices to destroy their competition, there's no blood or gore. When the game is played online, conversations between players aren't monitored. Otherwise, this has no inappropriate content at all.

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What's it about?

As a racing game, REDOUT: LIGHTSPEED EDITION doesn't have a story. Instead, it has a career mode, where you progress through a series of racing events so that you can earn money to improve your ship, which will help you win more racing events, and so on and so on, until you finally run out of races.

Is it any good?

If imitation really is the sincerest form of flattery, then the people who made the Wipeout series should be very proud that they've inspired this solid (and very similar) futuristic racing game. Like Wipeout, Redout: Lightspeed Edition has floating, jet-powered racing vehicles competing on tracks that, at times, have more in common with roller coasters than racetracks. You also have such offensive and defensive systems as an EMP shockwave and a shield. Even the announcer has the same kind of detached, slightly robotic, slightly British voice.

There are, of course, some differences between this and Wipeout. For starters, your engine pods can be damaged to the point of exploding if you scrape them against the sides of the track too much. You can avoid this by sliding your ship to the left or right slightly, which replaces the left and right air brakes of Wipeout. The aforementioned offensive and defensive systems are also ship-specific, and have to be bought and installed between races; they're not just lying around the tracks for anyone to pick up and use. This also doesn't have as cool a design sense as Wipeout, though it does add some cool (albeit merely cosmetic) weather effects to the tracks. Still, the racing is fun. Not only are this game's tracks twisty and varied, and the competition fierce, but it also has a really great sense of speed. Which is why Redout may be a rather blatant Wipeout clone, but it's the best Wipeout clone we've ever seen.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about driving safely. In the game, you drive a lot faster than you should in real life, but what does this show you about the importance of driving within the speed limits?

  • Talk about being careful. In this game, if you scrape up along the barriers too much, your car will explode, so what does this teach you about taking care of things you own?

  • Discuss originality. This game is really, really similar to another game series, so how do you think this game might benefit by being more unique and original?

Game details

Themes & Topics

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For kids who love racing

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