Rez Infinite

Game review by
David Chapman, Common Sense Media
Rez Infinite Game Poster Image
Immersive masterpiece of sights, sound in a virtual world.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

No message; more of an experience than adventure. The limited story is little more than an attempt to pin some sort of explanation on virtual world surrounding player.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Only real characters are the player (a hacker), the artificial intelligence he's trying to save. Neither is really developed, though, as they mainly exist to give a reason for player to be in game.

Ease of Play

Simple controls; easy to learn. Game flows with beat of music, but still a lot of on-screen action that can get overwhelming.

Violence

Players fly through a virtual computer-graphic wireframe environment blasting various objects, representing viruses attacking Eden AI. Viruses explode into shapes, colors, like fireworks.

Sex
Language
Consumerism

This is a remake/reboot of original Rez game, released in 2001/2002 for Dreamcast/PlayStation 2, which became a cult classic.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Rez Infinite is a downloadable shooter game. Players navigate through a surreal virtual environment, shooting odd-shaped objects, which explode in a shower of light and sound. The controls are simple to pick up and play, but the flashy visuals, on-screen action, and especially the VR experience may overwhelm younger players. Parents should also be aware that virtual reality equipment makers don't recommend VR experiences for kids under 12 due to the potential impact the technology may have on younger players’ physiological development.

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What's it about?

REZ INFINITE returns a classic to gamers with a brand-new digital experience. Fifteen years ago, gamers were introduced to the mindscape of Rez, a virtual world where players had to hack their way through a viral invasion while trying to recover the core AI responsible for handling the world's data. The game was a rhythmic experience, known for its vibrant visuals and synthesized electronic soundtrack. Now Rez is back and bringing its virtual world to virtual reality with Rez Infinite. With full 1080p HD visuals, 3D audio, an exclusive new level, and a revamped design specially for the PSVR, Rez Infinite is the ultimate way to play this cult classic.

Is it any good?

This musical shooter is one of the best VR games ever released and should be owned by everyone with a PSVR headset. Every once in a while a video game comes along that can be described as almost timeless. Rez was one of those games. Fifteen years after the original's release, Rez Infinite has a few new bells and whistles. First there's the 1080p full high-definition visual makeover. The original Rez managed to work wonders with wireframes and polygons, but Rez Infinite cranks the polish and colors to eleven. Shapes and textures flow together, and the upgraded 3D audio, with that classic Rez beat and electronic feel, gives you a thumping mind trip that somehow manages to be equal parts Zen garden and roller coaster.

Rez Infinite is, on its own, a fantastic revisit and update to a cult classic game, but when played on the PlayStation VR, it's a trip to a whole other world. The original game always did its best to try to convey that feeling of diving into a computer-generated world. When you slip on that VR headset, though, Rez Infinite makes you feel like you're truly plugged into a different reality. It's one thing to move an avatar around on a screen but another thing altogether when you're actually that avatar. You're surrounded by lights, sounds, and sensations that redefine immersion. It's no exaggeration to say that Rez Infinite is one of the best arguments for VR gaming and one of the best reasons for VR to exist.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the evolution of video games. How have games improved and changed over the years, and what do you think the future holds for video games?

  • Talk about the effects of rhythm and music. How does the soundtrack of a game help set the experience? Does good music help you get into the groove, or do you prefer silence when you're trying to accomplish tasks?

Game details

Themes & Topics

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For kids who love music

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