Rooms: The Unsolvable Puzzle

Game review by
Michael Lafferty, Common Sense Media
Rooms: The Unsolvable Puzzle Game Poster Image
Well-made sliding puzzle stuck with repetitive gameplay.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

Rewards players on how quickly they solve puzzles (based on fewest number of moves). Awards players "one-to-three" puzzle pieces (no meaning, really) for the level. Since levels aren't randomly generated, it's easy to go back, do it again to get a higher score. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

No positive role models. How quickly players solve puzzles will be a reward, but no characters to overtly pat you on the back. 

Ease of Play

Simple controls, but puzzles get progressively harder. Younger players may need parents' help to solve frustrating puzzles. 

Violence & Scariness

Rooms can be blown up, but no damage, harm to characters shown.

Language
Consumerism

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Rooms: The Unsolvable Puzzle is a downloadable puzzle title packed with 144 levels that get progressively harder as players move along. It requires players to move rooms around to allow the little girl (the central character) to move from the starting room to the door that will lead the player to the next level. Rooms has special items that help players move from room to room, but apart from players detonating obstructing rooms, there's no questionable content in the game.

User Reviews

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What's it about?

ROOMS: THE UNSOLVABLE PUZZLE is based on the sliding-puzzle mechanics of platform games. A famous toy maker and his mansion have completely disappeared and then magically reappeared with his rooms completely mixed up. The mansion is filled with gadgets that can help players solve puzzles by jumping from room to room, resorting the entire puzzle or blowing up impeding rooms. The goal is to get a little girl (Anne, the central figure in this tale) to move from a starting location to the door that leads to the next level.

Is it any good?

Rooms: The Unsolvable Puzzle is a sequel to a Wii and DS game that came out in 2010. Success is achieved by sliding the rooms around to get the little girl from a starting location to the door that leads to the next level. As players solve each puzzle, they're awarded one-to-three badges (three being the highest) to show how quickly it was solved. The problem here, though, is that rooms aren't randomly generated, so if a player solves it once and receives a low score, she can revisit the level and solve it much faster to achieve a higher score. That also ruins the replayability of the game, since players can memorize the solution.

The graphics are very nice, special effects are handled well, and the background music has a nice feel that accentuates the gameplay. Though the story is told well, there's a major disconnect between the story and the gameplay. Namely, there isn't any explanation as to how or why the story relates to the increasingly difficult puzzles, which doesn't help to draw in players. As a result, this is a game that's good for one play-through, especially for puzzle fans, but there isn't much replayability or a story to keep them playing once they're done.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about which skills players can use to solve puzzles or how to think through problems in the real world. Do you feel the same sense of satisfaction when you riddle out the answer to a tricky puzzle as when you defeat a difficult enemy in an action game, or is it different somehow?

  • Talk to children about balancing screen time and physical activity. It's important to spend time engaged in activities that promote good health and not only spend time glued to a computer or television screen. 

Game details

Themes & Topics

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For kids who love puzzles

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