Spy Kids: All the Time in the World

Game review by
Christopher Healy, Common Sense Media
Spy Kids: All the Time in the World Game Poster Image
Kids may get frustrated by tough, unforgiving gameplay.

Parents say

age 2+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 5+
Based on 3 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

Children are shown as capable, empowered characters. Even in the face of danger, the kids step up to get the job done. Family bonds are emphasized in the storyline and dialogue.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The brother and sister team (both of which, the player must control at different points) get along extremely well. They're supportive of one another and there's never any sibling bickering.

Ease of Play

The game is too difficult for the intended audience. Especially the platform-jumping sequences (of which there are many). Far too much precision is needed to launch your grappling hook (which only extends at a strange 45-degree angle) and grab onto the specific targets you need to hit in order to swing over a chasm. And this is the kind of game where, if you miss a jump, you end up back at the beginning, having to replay a long jumping sequence. There are no maps, so even figuring out where to go can be frustrating.

Violence & Scariness

The kids fight bad guys throughout, mostly hand-to-hand, with stiff punches that make the enemies blink white for a split second and eventually fall down and vanish. They can also throw bomb balls at the villains, which create a quick flash. In certain sequences, they fire lasers from a spaceship.

Language
Consumerism

The game is a direct tie-in to the film Spy Kids: All the Time in the World.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Spy Kids: All the Time in the World is a cartoony adaptation of the film of the same title. Players take on the roles of young secret agents out to stop a madman who wants to steal time itself. The content of the game is generally kid-friendly, with only some minor cartoon violence, but the gameplay requires too much precision for young children to handle and may be frustratingly difficult for some.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Kid, 10 years old June 17, 2014

Time OUT

I LOVED IT and so did my whole family
Teen, 16 years old Written byavereen April 16, 2012

nothing

nothing it bad

What's it about?

The plot of the game, SPY KIDS: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD follows that of the film it is based on. A madman who thinks humanity wastes time decides to teach us all a lesson by stealing hours, minutes, and seconds away from us. It's up to a brother and sister team of super-agent kids -- who hail from a long line of family spies -- to save the day.

Is it any good?

There may have been potential for Spy Kids: All the Time in the World to be a better game, but by the third level, young players will likely be growling in frustration. Far too much of the game is based around jumping over a gap, launching a grappling hook in midair, and swinging to the other side. But that hook is beast to handle. And it needs to hit relatively small targets in order to latch on. Constantly falling and having to replay the same jumping sequence is simply not fun. There are plenty of platforming games that are tough, but enjoyable as well -- missing a jump may be a bummer, but the quality of the game spurs you to tackle it again. That's not the case here, though. The rest of the game isn't interesting enough to make you want to fight through the difficult spots.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the game's storyline and theme. The villain wants to steal time away from people, because he thinks humanity wastes time and doesn't appreciate it. While his tactics are obviously wrong, is there any validity behind his motive?

  • What do you do when a game is particularly hard to play?

Game details

Themes & Topics

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