Storm Seekers

Game review by
Jenny Bristol, Common Sense Media
Storm Seekers Game Poster Image
Sharp forecasting game shows how weather patterns work.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Educational Value

Kids can learn to identify and predict weather patterns based on scientific information. Kids direct their own learning by roaming around and choosing to predict weather in more or less difficult geographies. The learning isn't deep -- a play session is about 15-30 minutes and focused on a small slice of content -- but what it targets it teaches well, and it has a lot of replayability. While the experience could benefit from more content coverage and a way for kids to toy with the weather, it's already a solid forecasting game and touches on essential -- and not-often-covered -- content in a slick package.

Positive Messages

Storm Seekers encourages good problem solving. There are both positive and negative results for players' actions.

Positive Role Models & Representations

There are no characters.

Ease of Play

Actions are limited and most are intuitive, so the learning curve is minimal. There are no save points, because it's a bite-size, episodic experience. 

Violence
Sex
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Storm Seekers is an educational game meant to teach kids how weather works. The game covers humidity, wind, clouds, and terrain factors. Kids move a weather balloon around the map, predicting the weather, including wind patterns, rain, and storms. It's suitable for middle and high school-level kids studying earth science or interested in meteorology, and there are no issues with privacy or offensive content.

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What's it about?

In STORM SEEKERS, the player is a \"fearless balloon pilot\" working for the Foul Weather Awareness Authority. The player roams around a map in a weather balloon, stopping at different locations. At each locale, the player must evaluate weather conditions and geography and, based on this information, make predictions about likely weather patterns.

Is it any good?

Storm Seekers is a nice mix of entertainment and education. It looks great and has a cool, accessible concept, but it's also intently focused on teaching kids about the science of weather prediction. Because of the ever-changing weather during a play session, there's no rote memorization, just informed analysis. Kids get to experiment with what works and what doesn't, gaining valuable knowledge about how weather conditions impact patterns and how environment and geography impact weather. It's also adaptable to kids of varying abilities. By choosing where they make their predictions, kids can adjust difficulty on the fly, choosing more predictable environments like lakes and oceans or more unpredictable mountainous regions. Kids are rewarded for successfully predicting more difficult choices, and their score is added up and displayed at the end. It's a clever concept that covers a rare subject with tons of polish and style, and all for a low price. Budding meteorologists will come back for more.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can discuss local TV weather reports. How do you think the weather person on the news predicts the weather? What tools would be useful to do what he or she does?

  • Families can explore different climates and the conditions that characterize them. 

  • Families can learn about local weather patterns. How do you think wind direction, humidity, and clouds affect the rainfall in your hometown? What local conditions result in common weather patterns in your region?

Game details

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For kids who love science and weather

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