Strike Vector EX

Game review by
Paul Semel, Common Sense Media
Strike Vector EX Game Poster Image
Fun sci-fi aerial dogfighting; lots of action, weak story.

Parents say

age 12+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

Only through practice and skill will you survive.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Pilots must work together to save their friends.

Ease of Play

Controls are simple to learn but need practice to master.

Violence

Players destroy other ships with guns, but there's no blood or gore.

Sex
Language

Frequent profanity such as "f--k," "a--," "s--t." One character admits that he wet himself.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Strike Vector EX is a downloadable aerial dogfighting game set in the future. Piloting a ship that can instantaneously switch between a fast-moving jet and a hovering craft, players get into gun battles with other pilots using a variety of guns and sci-fi weapons, though because the action is ship-to-ship, there's no blood or gore. In the story-driven campaign, characters use such saucy language as "f--k," "a--," and "s--t," while one admits that he "wet my seat." When played online, communication isn't moderated, so look out for inappropriate language.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 17 and 18+ year old Written bynuenjins January 22, 2018

Fun concept plays out generically.

Everything works well enough as you pilot a mech like jet that changes from a hover mode to a full throttle rocket mode seamlessly. The problem is is that ther... Continue reading

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What's it about?

In the story-driven campaign for STRIKE VECTOR EX, you start off as a pilot for one side of a conflict but quickly jump ship (no pun intended) to the pirates, which puts you at odds with your former friends. To be honest, it really doesn't matter. The story is overly simplistic and silly, but it gets the job done by setting up the action in this sci-fi dogfighting game nicely.

Is it any good?

By mixing elements of mech games and dogfighters, this downloadable aerial sci-fi shooter will engage those looking for combat that isn't two-dimensional. In Strike Vector EX, you pilot a ship (called a Vector) that can switch from a jet to a hovering tank on the fly. That's handy since you're going to get into a lot of battles with similar ships while flying over, around, and into floating industrial sites made of platforms, scaffolding, and power supplies. You can even do such cool moves as a quick dash to the right or left, which helps you avoid incoming missiles. In the game's multiplayer, which is its centerpiece, you'll play such familiar modes as "King of the Hill" and "Team Deathmatch" (called "Squad Battle" here), while the campaign has you battling through 15 short but varied missions. All of this you'll tackle with a customized Vector that not only can use a variety of guns but also some cool sci-fi systems such as nanobots that fix your ship in mid-flight and a Tesla Coil that painfully shocks any nearby enemies. But while this has you getting into some furious firefights in both modes, the campaign comes up a little short, not only because it only lasts a couple hours but also because it has a silly story that's badly acted. Not that it matters, since Strike Vector Ex still gives you a compelling reason to be flying around and shooting stuff in an exciting sci-fi game.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about violence in games such as Strike Vector Ex. Does it make a difference that you're shooting a ship instead of a person?

  • Talk about loyalty. Why is it important to be loyal to people you've promised to be loyal to? And when is it OK to walk away from that loyalty pledge, if ever?

Game details

Themes & Topics

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For kids who love flying

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