Tiger Woods PGA Tour 13

Game review by
Marc Saltzman, Common Sense Media
Tiger Woods PGA Tour 13 Game Poster Image
Hone your golf swing with Kinect-supported golf sim.

Parents say

age 9+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 9+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

This family-friendly video game is based on the professional sport of golf. Gamers can play as their favorite PGA or LPGA golfer or create their own character from scratch before stepping onto one of many championship courses. Because the game emulates real golf -- including encouraging players to perform a real swing in front of the television -- it has a positive message. It also reinforces the concept that hard work can pay off.

Positive Role Models & Representations

On one hand, Tiger Woods is a world-renowned sports figure; he started off playing as a young child and through hard work, determination, and guidance from his father and coaches became the most celebrated and recognized golfer in the world. But his personal life, including acts of infidelity and a much publicized divorce, have affected how the public perceives him. Therefore, whether the virtual Tiger is a good role model is tied to the real-world Tiger, and families might have conflicting views on his status. Gamers can also choose to play as another PGA or LPGA pro or can create their own character from scratch.

Ease of Play

For the first time in the series, Tiger Woods PGA Tour 13 supports the Kinect for Xbox 360 peripheral. You simply perform a golfer stance in front of the TV and swing a make-believe club as you would in real life. However, there's an issue with Kinect when it comes to navigating the small menus using your hands (it's better to use the voice option) and when you face the screen to hit the ball, your onscreen golfer is standing sideways, with their shoulder facing you, so there's a bit of a disconnect there. On the PlayStation 3 version, there's support for the PlayStation Move wireless controller. The controllers can also be used and make swinging the ball easier than in past games.

 

Violence & Scariness
Language

The game doesn't contain any profanity, but because gamers can play online, including support for talking into a microphone, kids might hear profanity uttered by other players.

Consumerism

Like the real sport of golf, the game has visible brands worn by the golfers or seen on billboards or signs. This includes Nike and Red Bull. Plus, the game also includes familiar branding tied to the real Masters tournament and other championship courses like TPC Sawgrass and St. Andrews.

 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know Tiger Woods PGA Tour 13 is golf simulation game that is appropriate for players of all ages. However, parents of younger players might want to keep kids from playing online with strangers since that chat is unsupervised and not moderated. Playing online might lead to exposure of inappropriate language.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Teen, 17 years old Written bygemlooter April 2, 2012

Good Game!

This is actually a pretty good game!

What's it about?

As with past golf games from EA Sports, you can play as or against Tiger woods in a handful of accurately-modeled championship courses, such as Pebble Beach, St. Andrews, TPC Sawgrass, and The Ocean Course at Kiawah Island in South Carolina. It's also the only video game that lets you vie to wear the Masters green jacket at Augusta National. Along with Tiger, you can choose to play as more than 20 golf pros, including LPGA golfers; plus you can create your own custom golfer from scratch.

New to this year's game is support for Kinect for Xbox 360. Now you don't have to use the controller to swing clubs if you don't want to -- you can strike a pose in front of your television and perform a real swing to hit the ball. Also new in Tiger Woods PGA Tour 13 is a game mode called Tiger Legacy Challenge. This is a treat for fans of Tiger, as you can play through his entire life to date. You begin with hitting balls in his backyard and an appearance at age 2 with Bob Hope on The Mike Douglas Show; and then play through his pre-teen and teen years; followed by his professional debut, when he first won the Masters at age 22; and then as Tiger becomes a living legend.

Is it any good?

There is a lot of gameplay here, including many different golfers and courses to choose from, multiple single-player and head-to-head online modes, and you've got many options for controlling the action. That said, there's an issue with Kinect when it comes to navigating the small menus using your hands (it's better to use the voice option) and when you face the screen to hit the ball, your onscreen golfer is standing sideways, with their shoulder facing you, so there's a bit of a disconnect there. Other issues include long load times and a stuttering frame rate at times.

Overall, however, the addition of Kinect support, Tiger Legacy Challenge mode, and the option to host online country club matches all add to the game's appeal. It might not be a hole in one, but Tiger Woods PGA Tour 13 should satisfy both new and seasoned golf fans alike. [Note: Besides Kinect and PlayStation Move support, both versions of the game look and play the same.]

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about whether Tiger's personal life should impact the desire to play this game. Can players, such as kids, separate the things they've heard about Tiger's personal life when they're playing this game? Does it take away the appeal to play as Tiger Woods on the golf course?

  • Are golf games your favorite type of sport games?

  • Do you like the addition of being able to play without a controller on Kinect?

Game details

Themes & Topics

Browse titles with similar subject matter.

For kids who love sports

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate