Tony Hawk's Project 8

Game review by
Bobbi Dempsey, Common Sense Media
Tony Hawk's Project 8 Game Poster Image
Possibly the best Tony Hawk game yet.
Popular with kids

Parents say

age 6+
Based on 3 reviews

Kids say

age 9+
Based on 23 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

Skaters are not portrayed as the most positive role models. A feature allows them to add graffiti to buildings and extra points are awarded for breaking bones and going to the hospital.

Violence

Mild violence: blood appears when skater wipes out (this feature can be disabled).

Sex

Occasional crude humor.

Language

Occasional swearing, usually after skater wipes out.

Consumerism

Close-up shots of brand-name sneakers. A character from the Jackass show/movies is featured.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

A few alcohol references.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that as with the other Tony Hawk titles, this game has a strong emphasis on rebelling against authority. Some crashes/falls include blood, and players can spray-paint buildings and other areas. The game glorifies taking unnecessary risks by rewarding players with extra points for breaking bones or ending up so hurt that they are hospitalized. This game can be played online; Common Sense Media does not recommend online play for anyone under the age of 12.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byHagPuppy 89 April 9, 2008

Some Points good/others bad

Common sense is a great website and their review of THP8 is mostly on, but i disagree with a few points. First is the BAM Margera-jackass part. Yes BAM is on th... Continue reading
Adult Written bybarbwork April 9, 2008
Teen, 15 years old Written byev63 March 28, 2015
Kid, 9 years old January 1, 2011

wow

so d**n fun love how many tricks you can do i like that my character is a kid and i can do cool tricks

What's it about?

This latest Tony Hawk adventure puts a whole new spin on the skater genre. It is called PROJECT 8 because it's the eighth game in the Tony Hawk series; in this game, Tony Hawk is on a quest to find the eight best skaters. You start off as a skater with a low ranking, so you need to do as many cool tricks as possible to move up in the rankings. You must achieve certain goals, but they aren't linear. You also have in-game skating showdowns against a variety of pro skaters, each of whom will dare you to do different mind-blowing stunts

Is it any good?

Project 8 includes all of the features gamers love about previous Tony Hawk titles, with some cool upgrades and additions. Bam Margera makes an appearance, which will please fans of the Jackass show (they will probably also like the way skaters can bail and get hurt); Jason Lee of My Name Is Earl also appears in a prominent role. Of course you can still show off your skater skills and do lots of fancy tricks. But now you also get to roam around in one big city and skate in all kinds of interesting areas along the way.

In this installment of the Tony Hawk series, the responses are quicker, and you have better control over your characters and the tricks they can perform. There is online support for up to eight players. While hardcore skaters will love this game the most, it has enough action and cool features to keep most other gamers hooked for quite a while, as well. This is the best skater game yet, with cool tricks and boredom-avoiding challenges -- but some of the skaters' bad and dangerous behavior should be addressed with kids who play it.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how extreme sports are different from regular sports. Do extreme sports appeal to you? Why or why not? Would you rather play them on the computer or in the real world?

  • Why do the skaters here tag buildings and try to break bones? Would that give skaters more cred in real life? What are the consequences of these actions? Would it be worth the risk?

Game details

Themes & Topics

Browse titles with similar subject matter.

For kids who love sports

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate