Zhu Zhu Puppies

Game review by
Christopher Healy, Common Sense Media
Zhu Zhu Puppies Game Poster Image
Uninteresting pet sim reinforces gender stereotypes.

Parents say

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Kids say

age 7+
Based on 2 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

While the game carries positive messages about being responsible for pets and how budgeting money is important, it also enforces gender stereotypes.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The game has gender stereotyping. Female dogs are given descriptions such as, "the prissiest," "has a keen fashion sense," and "loves to cuddle." The male dogs are described as "smart," and "a fearless leader," and "a typical guy."

Ease of Play

The only difficult thing about playing this game is waiting a full day for anything new to happen.

Violence & Scariness
Language
Consumerism

The game is based on the Zhu Zhu Puppies line of toys, and comes boxed with a limited edition puppy doll.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Zhu Zhu Puppies is a pet sim that asks kids to do a series of pet-related "chores" (some of these are non-chores, like "pet the dog") in order to earn an allowance. The allowance can then be spent on new items for the puppy. Be aware that the game encourages kids to play it every single day in order to earn more allowance and unlock new chores/games. Also note that the male and female puppies are described in incredibly stereotypical ways that assign almost all positive attributes to the male dogs.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Kid, 9 years old August 21, 2011

puppies

they are cute
Teen, 14 years old Written byMochiWolf May 20, 2018

Boring

I got this game when I was pretty young (about 7) and played it NON-STOP for about a month. The little puppies are SO cute (especially the little white mop dog,... Continue reading

What's it about?

In ZHU ZHU PUPPIES, you will be charged with completing a list of pet-related chores every day in order to earn an allowance that you can then spend on puppy supplies and accouterments. The chores must be performed in three minutes in order to earn the full allowance. This is easy to do, though. Chores involve things like petting the puppy, feeding the puppy, and taking the puppy outside to go potty. Most chores are completed with a few simple scribbles or taps of the stylus. Once chores are done, you can replay the same few games (like fetch) as often as you want. There will be nothing new to do until the next actual day.

Is it any good?

From the moment you're asked to choose a puppy to adopt in Zhu Zhu Puppies, you're left with a bad taste in your mouth. How can you feel good about impressionable kids hearing that boy dogs are brave and intelligent, while girl dogs are prissy and dramatic? But once you move past that unappealing notion and get to the game itself, you'll find that it's pretty boring. There's not much entertainment in filling a dog bowl by tapping it. And after three minutes, you literally have nothing new to do. You have to put your DS away until the next day when you'll be given a list of chores again -- and maybe you will have earned a new one by then. Eventually, you'll have more variety, but running this game on a real-time clock seems like a poor idea when there's so little to do in the first several days. There are much better pet sims out there.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about gender stereotypes. Only boy dogs are described as smart or having leadership qualities. Does this mean that girls can't be intelligent or commanding? Only girl dogs are described as enjoying cuddling. Does this mean boys don't need affection? How can descriptions like these hurt both boys and girls?

  • Did playing this simulation game make you want to own a pet?

Game details

For kids who love animals

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