Parents' Guide to

Ambush

By Jeffrey M. Anderson, Common Sense Media Reviewer

age 16+

Low-budget Vietnam War drama is thoughtful but very violent.

Movie R 2023 104 minutes
Ambush Movie Poster: The faces of Connor Paolo, Aaron Eckhart, and Jonathan Rhys Meyers are to the left of the title; below there are images of helicopters, men with guns, and an explosion

A Lot or a Little?

What you will—and won't—find in this movie.

Community Reviews

age 18+

Based on 1 parent review

age 18+

Don't bother watching, especially if you are a veteran!!

Did the writers even try to learn Army protocol & operating procedures? A corporal is the leader of the camp? The Captain yells at people for silly things? The Captain has but one mission and he fails at that in the second scene. Then this Colonel comes in, calls him self a Lt Col and says sir to the Captain?! Captain = He loses the "binder" and must go find it. I stopped there! Very bad movie. Don't bother watching. Bad directing, dialogue, and acting. the scenes are funky too. Strange cans of beer on the table.

Is It Any Good?

Our review:
Parents say: (1 ):
Kids say: Not yet rated

Despite a creaky plot setup and a small budget, this Vietnam War story delivers commentary on the hypocrisy of war while still respecting the people who risk their lives to fight. Ambush begins with Eckhart's character delivering an exposition dump about the valuable binder, but it's clear that it's all just a MacGuffin (i.e. an object that everyone in a movie is after). But once it becomes clear that the movie is really about Ackerman -- headliners Eckhart and Rhys Meyers have relatively small roles -- things pick up. Ackerman is quite interesting: He's trying to be a leader and prove himself while wearing his insecurities on his sleeve. When the mission starts, the men are physically separated by rank, with the lowest scurrying in the tunnels, the next up traipsing through the jungle, and the highest seated behind comfortable desks. That the mission ultimately means nothing underlines Ambush's dark themes, culminating in a speech by General Drummond that's as empty as it is true.

Movie Details

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