Anne Frank Remembered

Movie review by
Scott G. Mignola, Common Sense Media
Anne Frank Remembered Movie Poster Image
Powerful look at the Holocaust through teen eyes.
  • PG
  • 1995
  • 117 minutes

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age 9+
Based on 2 reviews

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The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

The willingness of some to harbor Jews at the risk of their own lives is shown, as well as the ingenious measures some took in pre-planning for their own survival.

Violence

Some brutal and heartrending descriptions of violence. The subject matter makes for an intensely emotional viewing experience. Briefly, grainy footage shows victims' starved and naked bodies, stacked and awaiting disposal.

Sex
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this program provides an emotional and educational experience that parents and their older children can share, but families may want to discuss beforehand what they know of the Holocaust, and the types of images the video is likely to show. Young viewers may be frightened by the chilling descriptions of the Holocaust. Although intensely emotional, the stories of survival under the most abominable of conditions are well worth hearing for those with a budding interest in the subject. Highly encouraged for anyone who's read -- or is interested in reading -- Anne Frank's famous diary, this documentary gives a human face to one of the greatest atrocities of our time.

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Teen, 14 years old Written byBestPicture1996 April 24, 2010

Oscar-winning greatness

I may've seen this movie outside of school because of my love of the Academy Awards....but probably not. Luckilly, I'm learning about this Language cl... Continue reading
Kid, 11 years old March 16, 2010
Absolutely amazing.This movie is so touching Kyra

What's the story?

Through interviews with schoolmates, relatives, camp survivors, and the family's heroic protector, Miep Gies, this documentary completes the story of young Anne Frank and her desperate last days. Archival footage and photographs punctuate their incredible stories of loss and survival. "She is perhaps Hitler's best-known victim. Her book has sold more than 25 million copies and has been translated into at least 55 languages." So begins this deeply affecting account not just of the tragedy that befell Anne Frank and her family, but also of the lives of millions of Jews stamped out during the German death marches of World War II.

Is it any good?

Director Jon Blair (returning to familiar territory following 1982’s Schindler) exercises integrity and restraint in the making of this difficult picture, a Best Documentary Feature Oscar winner. Kenneth Branagh's narration is straightforward, as are Glenn Close's off-camera readings from the now-famous diaries. Neither actors "perform" here; they're doing a job, and they do it with simple dignity.

No attempt is made to sensationalize the accounts of those whose lives touched Anne Frank's. The stories spoken by survivors and relatives (among them Anne's beloved father Otto, from an earlier interview) generate enough pain and drama for several movies. The video provides an emotional and educational experience that parents and their older children can share, but families may want to discuss beforehand what they know of the Holocaust, and the types of images the video is likely to show.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the feelings that come up after watching the film, as well as the effect on hatred on people's lives.

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