Barefoot in the Park

Movie review by
Andrea Beach, Common Sense Media
Barefoot in the Park Movie Poster Image
Cute, funny romance OK for kids, will appeal more to teens.
  • NR
  • 1967
  • 106 minutes

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Making a marriage work takes compromise. You have to sacrifice a little bit of yourself to make your spouse happy. You'll be a better person if you incorporate the best of your spouse into yourself.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Newlyweds Paul and Corie learn about the give-and-take that makes a marriage work. They get mad at each other and argue and are tempted to give up on the marriage, but their love sustains their relationship as they also learn that they can rely on one another. Corie's mother, Ethel, is loving and supportive and a good sport.

Violence
Sex

The newlyweds are seen kissing a lot, especially at the beginning. The kisses are long, but there's no tongue. They're shown lying in bed together fully clothed and bundled against the cold. Corie is seen once in pants and a bra and once in a full slip as she's getting dressed.

Language

"Damn" is used once.

Consumerism

Lord and Taylor is mentioned once.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

The characters are frequently depicted drinking alcoholic beverages.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that there's very little of potential concern here. The adults are frequently shown drinking alcohol, "damn" is used once, and there's a lot of kissing, although not with tongue. The theme of what it takes to make a marriage work is central to the story. In general the movie is unlikely to be of interest to kids, but they certainly don't need to leave the room when it's on.

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What's the story?

Paul (Robert Redford) and Corie (Jane Fonda) are crazy in love. But after their honeymoon, as they try to start their life together in their cheap, crummy apartment, their differences become magnified. He's too straight-laced, and she's too wild and crazy. When things start to fall apart, they'll have to figure out that it takes a lot more than love to make a marriage work.

Is it any good?

This is a delightful, funny adaptation of Neil Simon's play by the same name. It's wonderfully written and acted, with an especially delightful turn by Charles Boyer as the eccentric upstairs neighbor. Director Gene Saks does an excellent job bringing life, fluidity, and dynamics to watching a play, finding settings other than the apartment and moving the camera around the confined space gracefully.

The situation is likely to appeal mostly to older teens as they enter into long-term relationships and start to fantasize about what their adult lives might be like. They'll enjoy watching the attractive and relatable Paul and Corie as they struggle to make their relationship work.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about what makes a marriage, or any long-term relationship, work. What do Paul and Corie learn about how to get along with each other and be happy?

  • Do you think Paul and Corie's marriage will last? Why, or why not?

  • Do you think it's different for young couples starting out today than how it's shown in this movie from 1967? What kinds of things are the same?

Movie details

For kids who love romance

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