Barney: Let's Go to the Moon

Movie review by
Grace Montgomery, Common Sense Media
Barney: Let's Go to the Moon Movie Poster Image
Dinosaur helps kids use their imaginations and be confident.
  • NR
  • 2013
  • 66 minutes

Parents say

age 10+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 7+
Based on 3 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Educational Value

Teaches about the moon and a few fun facts about space.

Positive Messages

Use your imagination, dream big, and follow your dreams. Everything is better when you share it with friends. It's always better to tell the truth, no matter what.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Barney encourages kids to be honest and confident and use their imaginations. He's supportive but lets kids figure out the right thing to do on their own without being pushy.

Violence & Scariness
Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism

Lots of Barney tie-ins and products available.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Barney: Let's Go to the Moon is a short movie about space and using your imagination starring Barney, preschoolers' favorite purple dinosaur. Barney shares a few fun facts about the moon but mostly encourages kids to use their imaginations and be anything they want to be. There also are some great lessons about the dangers of bragging and the importance of being truthful.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Kid, 7 years old July 21, 2015
Kid, 10 years old February 15, 2018

barney is actually educational

you see, it teaches kids, and there are liars who say that barney has (____) uses of a bad word, it is just, no, so liars who hate barney, go back, and... Continue reading

What's the story?

Riff (Michaela Dietz) wants to build a rocket ship and fly to the moon. Barney (Dean Wendt) isn't sure that Riff will make it but encourages him to just keep trying and to use his imagination. While everyone starts thinking about the moon, Barney reads the kids "Once Upon a Moon," which reminds Baby Bop (Julie Johnson) that she's good friends with the moon. But to her dismay, the moon is broken and she can only see a little piece of him. Barney assures her that the moon is OK and takes the kids on a rocket ship to meet the man on the moon, who teaches them about the different phases the moon goes through. When they come back to Earth, B.J., otherwise known as Captain Pickles, brags to his friends that he can jump all the way to the moon. Realizing that maybe he can't actually jump that high, B.J. tells Barney about his troubles, who tells him the best thing you can do is to be honest with your friends.

Is it any good?

This probably won't appeal to anyone but the preschool crowd. But Barney does a great job encouraging kids to be confident and use their imaginations with silly songs (a mix of old favorites and new numbers) that are easy to sing along to. BARNEY: LET'S GO TO THE MOON also does a great job of showing some uncomfortable situations (such as getting stuck in a lie) and how to gracefully find your way out of them in a way that's understandable and relatable to very young kids. 

Young space aficionados may be disappointed that the movie really doesn't have a whole lot about space in it beyond the short-lived rocket trip and a lot of talk about the moon, but they'll most likely be encouraged to imagine their own rocket trips to space. And parents will love the message that you can accomplish anything if you just keep trying.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about superheroes. Can both boys and girls be superheroes? What characteristics do superheroes have?

  • Why is bragging bad? What negative consequences can it have?

  • How do you use your imagination?

Movie details

For kids who love preschool tales

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