Batman: Bad Blood

Movie review by
Renee Schonfeld, Common Sense Media
Batman: Bad Blood Movie Poster Image
Superviolent superhero mayhem with a complex story.
  • PG-13
  • 2016
  • 74 minutes

Parents say

age 13+
Based on 4 reviews

Kids say

age 10+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Good triumphs over evil. Teamwork succeeds.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Batman and his team of superheroes are smart, brave, loyal, and strong, with a variety of superhuman skills. Antagonists are arch-villains with a variety of superhuman skills. Female heroine is comfortable as a lesbian. Ethnic diversity.

Violence

Cartoon violence and mayhem take up most of the screen time: buildings exploding and collapsing, gunfights, fistfights, swordplay, heroes held captive and tortured, landslides, stabbing, a beheading. Heroic characters are under assault repeatedly, sometimes appear to be dead. The earlier deaths of Batwoman's mom and sister are referenced and glimpsed.

Sex

A brief fantasy shows Batman, naked from the waist up, in the prelude to sexual activity with three women. Several references to the fact that Kate Kane (Batwoman) is a lesbian; a scene in which she meets a potential love interest in a bar.

Language

Some cursing: "crap," "badass," "damn," "bitch," "hell," "pissed off," "a--hole."

Consumerism

Another entry in the vast Batman franchise.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

A bit of social drinking. Kate Kane (Batwoman) refers to a past in which she was a heavy drinker.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Batman: Bad Blood is a typical example of this superhero's modern-day direct-to-DVD adventures. Artful animated violence, accompanied by suspenseful, dynamic music, fills the screen for most of the story's 74-minute running time. One assorted team of Batman accomplices faces off against a motley gang of Gotham City's villains in a series of lengthy action set pieces that include: explosions, gun battles, physical fights to the death, heroes taken hostage, destruction of buildings, and, in this instance, torture. Characters are disguised, then revealed. Both heroes and villains appear to be dead, then are restored to life. Several references are made to Batwoman's (Kate Kane) sexuality; she meets a policewoman who may become a romantic interest in the future. Swearing includes "bitch," "ass," "damn," "hell," "crap," and "pissed off," sometimes uttered by the boy hero Robin. There's a bit of social drinking in the background, a revelation that Kate Kane had substance-abuse problems in the past, and one character shown sneaking a drink from a flask.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 7 year old Written byFairuzan04 June 18, 2016

Decently complex reflection of family, with various interwoven parallels

As with all Warner Bros DC animations, adults will appreciate this more. I won't give any spoilers save this - I wish there had been ample forewarning rega... Continue reading
Adult Written byHewitt August 20, 2016

GOOD

Its telling you to look after family but there is blood and violnce
Teen, 14 years old Written byComicBookGirl August 19, 2018

Awesome Tribute to the Batfam!

This movie is perfect for any active comic book fan who knows the characters within the batfamily. There is a bit of violence, but I feel it is the appropriate... Continue reading

What's the story?

The world is in danger yet again in BATMAN: BAD BLOOD. This time it's a consortium of players from Batman's enemy list: Talia al Ghul (Morena Baccarin), Jervis Tetch, Firefly, and the Heretic, a new boy in town, are eager for takeover. They've kidnapped Batman (Jason O'Mara); his trusted allies think he's dead; Gotham City is under siege. Nightwing (Sean Maher), Robin (Stuart Allan), Batwing (Ernie Hudson), and Batwoman (Yvonne Strahovski) join Alfred in a desperate effort to fight in Batman's stead. The team tries to retrieve technology that has been stolen from Wing Industries before it's used for evil purposes. Along the way, secrets are revealed, identities shift, and Batman is found alive, only to behave in a strange, unsettling way. The climactic sequence occurs at a technology summit hosted by Wayne Industries, in which dignitaries from all over the world look on in awe at the newest accomplishments. However, the summit is not what it seems. When the true villains are exposed, hand-to-hand combat and earth-shattering technical mayhem threatens them all.

Is it any good?

Quality animation, solid voice performances, and rousing music make this just right for ongoing fans of Batman original DVDs. As usual, the story is complex; the huge array of villains from days past is hard to keep straight. Who's working for whom? Who's using whose identity? Is Batman really Batman or is he Nightwing, or neither? Less Batman-savvy viewers may need to research the various backstories. But the action never stops in Gotham. The villains never give up, die anyway, and somehow manage to revive long enough to appear in a later tale. Parents should note that the tale is very violent but without blood, graphic injuries, or certain death.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how much of this film relies on previous knowledge of the heroes and villains. Do you think knowing who the characters are is essential to this story? Why, or why not? Where would you go to get details about these heroes and villains from Batman's long history?

  • Think about all the products, games, movies, and TV shows that are part of the Batman marketing universe. How does each contribute to the success of the franchise? How does each Batman product help sell another?

  • What is meant by the term "diversity" in films and stories? In their effort to make Batman a more diverse brand, which characters and events did the filmmakers showcase in this story? 

Movie details

Themes & Topics

Browse titles with similar subject matter.

For kids who love superheroes

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate