Bringing Down the House

Movie review by
Nell Minow, Common Sense Media
Bringing Down the House Movie Poster Image
Martin and Latifah rule in boundary-pushing PG-13.
  • PG-13
  • 2003
  • 105 minutes

Parents say

age 2+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 12+
Based on 6 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Violence

None Mild scariness and peril, mostly comic

Sex

Strong sexual references for a PG-13

Language

Strong language for a PG-13

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

A lot of drinking, drug humor, references to drug use

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this movie has some very strong material for a PG-13, including explicit sexual references and a graphic apparent sexual situation, very strong language, a lot of drinking, and drug humor (it's supposed to be very funny that a very dignified elderly lady gets stoned on marijuana). A young teenage girl sneaks out with a boy and finds it more than she can handle when he takes her to a party where people are drinking and doing drugs and he tries to force her to have sex. It is supposed to be funny that Peter's son reads a dirty magazine (that belongs to Peter) and that Peter's sister-in-law is essentially a paid girlfriend for very elderly rich men. Some people may be offended by some of the racist language and stereotypes, but the movie is clear that it is offensive and stupid to be bigoted and cowardly and foolish to be silent when those views are expressed.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Teen, 15 years old Written byfrogusa005 April 9, 2008
This movie was awesome! Personally, I don't think it was quite as naughty and full of bad material as the reviews said..it definatly deserved a pg-13 rati... Continue reading
Teen, 15 years old Written bymoviefan7 May 3, 2013

Bringing Down The House

It was really good. I loved it. The music that Latifah did was great. But it was really inappropriate, so it's not something for kids.

What's the story?

In BRINGING DOWN THE HOUSE, Steve Martin plays Peter, a lawyer who works too hard. He is separated from his wife and cancels a long-planned vacation with his children because he is under a lot of pressure to land a wealthy and very proper new client (Joan Plowright). He meets a woman on the internet and makes a date with her, thinking she is a pretty blonde lawyer. But it turns out to be Charlene (Queen Latifah), a convicted felon who wants him to help her clear her record. She not only knows how to torture him into helping her -- she enjoys it. And while he is fuming on the outside, it is clear that at some level, he is enjoying it, too.

Is it any good?

This is Steve Martin's best film in years. The character and situations are made for him. Queen Latifah is sensational -- warm, funny, and sexy and utterly charming. The script loses its way several times, particularly with a tasteless plot line about Peter's racist society party girl of a sister-in-law. But that doesn't matter much since most of the plot makes no sense at all. But this is still a better-than-average comedy that works very well much of the time. Queen Latifah's wonderfully radiant star quality, Steve Martin's comic grace and Eugene Levy's masterful turn as Peter's besotted partner do bring down the house.

This movie falls squarely in what I call the "Cat in the Hat" genre, in which a straight-laced person (A) who plays by the rules has his or her life turned upside down by someone (B) who represents uncertainty, vitality, and taking risks. After A complains about how B is irresponsible and how B is messing everything up, there is always a scene in which A tells B, "I learned/got so much more from you than you ever did from me! This is the best day of my life!"

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about Charlene's advice to Peter on how to communicate with his teenage daughter. They should also talk about how the adults in their family try to maintain a balance between work and family and how to best communicate to family members that they are the top priority.

Movie details

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