Broken Lizard's Club Dread

Movie review by
Nell Minow, Common Sense Media
Broken Lizard's Club Dread Movie Poster Image
This slasher/comedy isn't funny or entertaining.
  • R
  • 2004
  • 103 minutes

Parents say

age 13+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 16+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Many stereotypes. Crude humor.

Violence

Grisly murders, graphic injuries. Scary surprises.

Sex

Nudity, very explicit sexual references and situations, including threesomes, oral sex.

Language

Very strong language.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Drinking and drug use.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this movie has extremely strong language and explicit sexual references and situations, including a threesome, bestiality, sex toys, and oral sex. Characters are in peril and there are several grisly murders with graphic wounds and a severed head. A character pees in his pants. Drinking, drug use, and promiscuous sex are portrayed as carefree and empowering. Drinking games include a super-soaker filled with tequila.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bycallofduty5 January 22, 2011

LOL, just lol

lolololo i laughed so many times during the film. I'd say it's good for teens aged 13+ nothing very explicit theres the scene where man's head ro... Continue reading
Teen, 17 years old Written byRorie6 January 9, 2011

Great Movie :)

I love this movie. broken Lizad is amazing! Lots of cursing and sexual and drug referancces and some nudity and some bloody murders, pretty obiously fake, but... Continue reading

What's the story?

This second film from the would-be wild and crazy guys from would-be comedy troupe Broken Lizard features their signature crass sex and drug jokes and adds in grisly violence courtesy of a masked serial killer with a machete. The story takes place at the island resort owned by Coconut Pete (Bill Paxton), a slightly burnt-out Jimmy Buffett-type who had four gold records with songs about kicking back in paradise (he insists his "Pina Colada Burg" pre-dated "Margaritaville"). The resort is like a grown-up version of the place Pinocchio turned into a donkey -- all sex, drugs, drinking, and more sex. And lots of girls in and out of bikinis. The movie opens with a threesome drinking Ecstasy-spiked margaritas as they get ready to have sex with each other. They are all slashed to death by a masked killer, and the rest of the movie is just one dumb joke after another as almost-interchangeable characters are killed off.

Is it any good?

The world did not need a comic slasher movie -- or, to be more precise, another failed attempt at one, such as this is. BROKEN LIZARD'S CLUB DREAD lacks imagination, wit, acting ability, or distinctive characters.

What it does have is a lot of joke-oids -- dialogue that has the rhythm of a joke but is no actual comic content. When a sweet young thing tells a character that she goes to Oral Roberts University, you know what the joke-oid is going to be. And imagine the non-riotous non-humor they can find in an Asian character whose name, Yu, sounds just like the word "you!" Twice! And then there's that little statue with the huge genitals. And the sex in a graveyard: "Isn't this like sacred or something?" "No, they're dead!" And the bestiality humor. They even throw in that gone-and-should-have-been-forgotten chestnut, sarcastic clapping.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how the characters decided whom to trust.

Movie details

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