Country Strong

  • Review Date: January 5, 2011
  • Rated: PG-13
  • Genre: Drama
  • Release Year: 2011
  • Running Time: 100 minutes

Common Sense Media says

Well-acted drama deals with alcohol abuse and more.
  • Review Date: January 5, 2011
  • Rated: PG-13
  • Genre: Drama
  • Release Year: 2011
  • Running Time: 100 minutes

Age(i)

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17

Quality(i)

 

What parents need to know

Positive messages

Despite the movie's positive message about performing for the love of music and not for fame and money, there's some darker stuff here, too. Kelly's descent into depression and her relapse reinforce the idea that you have to choose between success (fame) and true love, because money corrupts everything, including marriage. The consequences of substance abuse are made clear.

Positive role models

Many of the characters -- including main character Kelly -- act self-destructively or selfishly, but Beau is a positive role model. He's a singer-songwriter who believes in the power of music and has no interest in becoming famous as long as he can still play for people. He sees beyond Chiles' beauty queen persona to fall in love with the deeper woman she is beneath the facade, and he is the only one who has Kelly's health foremost in his mind.

Violence

Several references to the alcohol-fueled accident that leads to the death of Kelly's unborn baby. Someone sends Kelly a bloodied baby doll with the words "Baby Killer" painted on it. James punches Beau in the face. Beau has to push away a couple of angry patrons in a bar. Beau punches a guy who's taking advantage of Kelly. A character dies unexpectedly.

Sex

Kelly and Beau are involved in an adulterous relationship. They kiss passionately and in one scene are shown on a bed, having just taken a shower (presumably together) and about to make love, but one of them stops it mid-kiss. Kelly and James kiss and embrace. Beau and Chiles flirt, undress down to their underwear, and eventually spend the night together -- bare backs and shoulders are shown, and it's clear they've made love, since the next scene is of them in bed together, with a sheet draped across them. Kelly is shown in a compromising position with a man who can help her professionally.

Language

Swearing increases in frequency throughout the movie and includes "s--t," "a--hole," "bulls--t," "hell," "bitch," "damn," "oh my God," and "goddamn."

Consumerism

A Ford truck.

Drinking, drugs, & smoking

Kelly is an alcoholic, and she relapses in several scenes that show her drinking -- alone, straight from a vodka bottle -- or at a bar acting very drunk. Beau smokes cigarettes, as do members of his band and members of the audience -- especially at bar gigs, where almost everyone is drinking. Prescription pills are abused.

Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that this Gwyneth Paltrow country music drama involves many mature issues that may not be appropriate for young teens -- including alcohol abuse, rehab, relapses, prescription-pill addiction, infidelity, and depression. A couple of scenes show couples about to have or having sex, but there's no nudity beyond a bare shoulder or back. Language gets stronger in the second half of the film, which features many more instances of "s--t," "a--hole," and their derivatives. Overall, the movie offers a strong warning about the consequences of alcohol abuse, but an even more central message is that love and fame don't always go hand in hand -- and that love should always win between the two.

Parents say

Kids say

What's the story?

Kelly Canter (Gwyneth Paltrow) is a six-time-Grammy-winning country music sensation -- but she's also an ugly drunk who was so intoxicated at a fateful Dallas concert that she ended up causing her own miscarriage. The movie's story begins almost a year later, as Kelly is prematurely withdrawn from rehab by her slick husband/manager, James (Tim McGraw), who's planned a multi-city tour culminating in a comeback Dallas appearance. James has lined up a young former beauty queen, Chiles Stanton (Leighton Meester), to open for Kelly, but Kelly insists that Beau Hutton (Garrett Hedlund), her "sponsor" from rehab who's also a singer-songwriter, come along as well. The four of them set off on the ill-timed tour, only to discover that Kelly isn't better at all and Chiles is more than she seems. Ultimately, if she can't overcome her demons, Kelly could lose not only her fans' loyalty but also her viability as a country superstar.

Is it any good?

QUALITY
 

Paltrow is believable as a superstar country singer who acts tough but is quite fragile. Her portrayal isn't a revelation like Sissy Spacek's unforgettable turn as Loretta Lynn in Coal Miner's Daughter, but between Paltrow's fantastic guest spot on Glee and this leading role, the Academy Award winner has been doing a great job of reminding audiences she can act and sing. A couple of scenes with McGraw feel more forced than intimate, and there are more than a few predictably maudlin monologues and conversations, but there's no denying that Paltrow is a powerful presence on-screen.

All of that said, the emotional core of COUNTRY STRONG is definitely Hedlund, who plays a young singer unwilling to sell out with an intensity and vulnerability that was lacking in his performance in TRON: Legacy. His is the movie's only truly redeeming character -- a man who sees Kelly for who she is and is actually worried about her in a way that her own husband can't muster. Even more surprising is that Hedlund sang his own songs, just like Paltrow. Meester, meanwhile, nails the sugary-sweet public persona that hides the desperate ambition of a young woman who wants a big career. Still, despite the impressive singing and strong performances, some of the dialogue and plot turns are too hammy to make this a four- or five-star film.

Families can talk about...

  • Families can talk about the movie's central message about love versus fame. Which wins out in the end? Do you think that they can't co-exist?

  • How does the movie portray the consequences of drinking? Do you think it's a realistic depiction? What did Kelly's alcoholism cost her personally and professionally?

  • How does this movie -- which is about a fictional singer -- compare to dramas you've seen about real-life stars? Are there any musicians that Kelly, Beau, or Chiles remind you of?

Movie details

Theatrical release date:January 7, 2011
DVD release date:April 12, 2011
Cast:Garrett Hedlund, Gwyneth Paltrow, Leighton Meester, Tim McGraw
Director:Shana Feste
Studio:Screen Gems
Genre:Drama
Run time:100 minutes
MPAA rating:PG-13
MPAA explanation:thematic elements involving alcohol abuse and some sexual content

This review of Country Strong was written by

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Teen, 15 years old Written byTheSuperman765 April 14, 2011
AGE
12
QUALITY
 

i rate this title IFFY for ages 12+

The good stuff * Role models: Many of the characters -- including main character Kelly -- act self-destructively or selfishly, but Beau is a positive role model. He's a singer-songwriter who believes in the power of music and has no interest in becoming famous as long as he can still play for people. He sees beyond Chiles' beauty queen persona to fall in love with the deeper woman she is beneath the facade, and he is the only one who has Kelly's health foremost in his mind. What to watch out for * Messages: Despite the movie's positive message about performing for the love of music and not for fame and money, there's some darker stuff here, too. Kelly's descent into depression and her relapse reinforce the idea that you have to choose between success (fame) and true love, because money corrupts everything, including marriage. The consequences of substance abuse are made clear. * Violence: Several references to the alcohol-fueled accident that leads to the death of Kelly's unborn baby. Someone sends Kelly a bloodied baby doll with the words "Baby Killer" painted on it. James punches Beau in the face. Beau has to push away a couple of angry patrons in a bar. Beau punches a guy who's taking advantage of Kelly. A character dies unexpectedly. * Sex: Kelly and Beau are involved in an adulterous relationship. They kiss passionately and in one scene are shown on a bed, having just taken a shower (presumably together) and about to make love, but one of them stops it mid-kiss. Kelly and James kiss and embrace. Beau and Chiles flirt, undress down to their underwear, and eventually spend the night together -- bare backs and shoulders are shown, and it's clear they've made love, since the next scene is of them in bed together, with a sheet draped across them. Kelly is shown in a compromising position with a man who can help her professionally. * Language: Swearing increases in frequency throughout the movie and includes "s--t," "a--hole," "bulls--t," "h--l," "bi-ch," "d--n," "oh my God," and "godd--n." * Consumerism: A Ford truck. * Drinking, drugs, & smoking: Kelly is an alcoholic, and she relapses in several scenes that show her drinking -- alone, straight from a vodka bottle -- or at a bar acting very drunk. Beau smokes cigarettes, as do members of his band and members of the audience -- especially at bar gigs, where almost everyone is drinking. Prescription pills are abused
What other families should know
Too much sex
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
Educator Written byRynMa January 25, 2012
AGE
18
QUALITY
 

How do you define PG-13?

This movie was a horrific display! I am ashamed to even say that I bothered watching it - even in hopes of it getting better - which it NEVER did!
What other families should know
Too much swearing
Kid, 11 years old September 1, 2011
AGE
13
QUALITY
 

Suicidal Nonsense

I would have given this movie four stars if it wasn't for the fact Kelly sings a strong and powerful song and gets her life back together and everything's going great. Yet, after her outstanding performance she decides to overdose of her prescribed medication and end her life. I think that's a horrible thing to do and a bad message. Besides that, the movie was fine but doubtful towards Texas. People there aren't like that Dallas isn't Nashville. People that live in Texas don't live in places like dessert, Arizona. Texans are just like everyone else and don't have twangs unless like people that can be from anywhere, are from small towns. I found this movie offense. Although, it wasn't poorly written, or had an empty storyline. The screen writer was decent, I suppose. So my overall review is, just fine.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking

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