Cowspiracy

Movie review by
Brian Costello, Common Sense Media
Cowspiracy Movie Poster Image
Provocative docu has some graphic scenes of animal cruelty.
  • NR
  • 2014
  • 90 minutes

Parents say

age 15+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 9+
Based on 2 reviews

We think this movie stands out for:

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Encourages care for the environment through personal responsibility and direct action. Compassion, courage, and curiosity are important themes.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Kip Andersen shows bravery and perseverance as the funding to his film is cut off. He also adopts a vegan diet after his research into how much water is used for livestock and how much environmental degradation occurs due to livestock and dairy farming.

Violence

A duck in a backyard farm is graphically decapitated by a man with a machete; there's blood, close-ups of nerves, and the animal's death rattle. Scenes of elephants being shot with rifles. Cows led to slaughter. Image of dead wolf on a barbed wire gate.

Sex
Language

"Piss."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Cowspiracy is a 2014 documentary addressing how animal agriculture is the largest cause of pollution worldwide and that none of the largest environmental groups are talking about it. There are some graphic scenes of animal death: Most disturbingly, a duck in a backyard farm is decapitated with a machete, and there also are scenes of elephants being shot and killed with rifles and a dead wolf sprawled over a barbed wire fence. In addition to confronting agribusiness and environmental groups, this documentary espouses that many of the planet's woes (water shortages, climate change, starvation, and poverty in the developing world) could end if more people switched to a vegan diet. For parents and older kids concerned about how our food choices are adversely affecting the environment, this is a must-see documentary and should provoke discussion and perhaps change in eating habits.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 6, 12, and 15 year old Written byRheanna D. April 22, 2017
Teen, 15 years old Written byMaflgo April 30, 2017
Teen, 14 years old Written byW4ffle February 19, 2017

This movie/documentary needs to be seen by everyone

The documentary is about how the meat and dairy industry affects our planet, the human race, and every animal that we should be sharing with on this earth. It g... Continue reading

What's the story?

After watching An Inconvenient Truth, COWSPIRACY director Kip Andersen tries to do everything he can in his personal life not to contribute to the pollution causing climate change -- he takes shorter showers, rides a bike instead of driving a car, recycles. But when he inadvertently stumbles across a friend's Facebook post about how much water and land is overused by animal agriculture, he wonders why no one is talking about this, especially the largest environmental groups in the world. In this documentary, Andersen seeks to find out why Greenpeace, the Sierra Club, and Oceana, among others, not only are failing to address the havoc wreaked by livestock methane, overfishing, and factory farms but also aren't even bringing it up. The statistics he uncovers are shocking: For instance, in a time of water shortages in California, it requires 660 gallons of water to make a quarter-pound hamburger. As he continues to make the movie even as the film's financial backers cut off funding due to perceived pressure from agribusiness and environmental groups, Petersen comes to the inevitable conclusion that the only way to stop climate change, the destruction of our rainforests, world poverty, and water shortages is to adopt a vegan diet.

Is it any good?

This is a provocative, unforgettable, and must-see documentary. Though it adheres to a common-enough documentary formula of David vs. Goliath (or Michael Moore vs. General Motors), what's most shocking is how the filmmaker, Kip Petersen, confronts so much silence from the largest environmental groups whom one would think would have the most to say about the environmental havoc wreaked by animal agriculture and the excessive consumption of meat and dairy products in North America and Europe. While such silence would be expected from, say, Monsanto, the stonewall treatment Petersen receives at the hands of Greenpeace is surprising.

Though many documentaries encourage consumers to adopt a vegan diet, Cowspiracy presents the facts and benefits of making such a switch in such a way that it seems like pretty much the only option we have if we want to save our environment. The facts and statistics throughout the film -- about how much water is used to feed cattle, how much land is used for grazing, how powerful the agribusiness lobbies in the United States and the world are -- are easy to understand. For families concerned about the environment, this should provoke discussion on how personal responsibility and lifestyle changes can save our world's most precious resources.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the statistics in Cowspiracy. How were they presented? Were they made easy to understand?

  • What might be some counterarguments made by those who disagree with the premises presented in the film?

  • This film also the filmmaker's attempts to talk with various environmental groups and his own awakening into personal change after learning about how personal choices affect the environment. Did his story help or hinder the overall message of the movie? What if his story wasn't in the film and, instead, the documentary focused more on the facts?

  • How does Cowspiracy promote courage, curiosity, and compassion? Why are these important character strengths?

Movie details

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