Diamonds

Movie review by
Nell Minow, Common Sense Media
Diamonds Movie Poster Image
Originally rated R, this weak tale disappoints.
  • PG-13
  • 2000
  • 91 minutes

Parents say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Prejudice against elderly and infirm.

Violence

Mugging, fistfights, gun threat, car crash.

Sex

Extensive and fairly explicit -- long scenes in brothel.

Language

Some strong language.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Liquor, marijuana, cigars and cigarettes positively portrayed as evidence of masculinity and maturity.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this movie originally received an R rating, but the MPAA backed down after Kirk Douglas lodged a complaint. They should have kept it an R. Nearly a third of the movie is set in a brothel, cutting back and forth between the sexual encounters of the three generations. While there is no nudity, the discussions of the encounters are explicit. Drinking, smoking, fighting, sex, and drug use are casually used as positive indicators of maturity and masculinity. A father takes his underage son to the brothel as an introduction to sex.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's the story?

Kirk Douglas plays Harry, an aging boxer recovering from a stroke, who wants to retreive some lost "magic diamonds" he once hid in Reno. He sets off with his son (Dan Ackroyd) and grandson (Corbin Allred) in search of the goods.

Is it any good?

You haven't seen many movies if you don't guess that some major bonding is accomplished and some long-standing family wounds are healed along the way in DIAMONDS. We want to like it. There's a reason that road movies that feature both adventure and reconciliation are so popular, and of course we're rooting for Kirk Douglas' recovery from a stroke even more than for the character's. And every so often it captures us with a genuine moment of humor or connection between the characters. But far more often it gets in its own way, especially with attitudes about drinking, smoking, fighting, and women that were out of date when the yellowing clippings in Harry's scrapbook were first printed.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the struggle Ackroyd's character has to be the father he wishes his own father had been, the importance of letting people know that you love, respect, and support them, and how it feels to be suddenly alone and disabled.

Movie details

For kids who love comedies

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate