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Doraemon: New Nobita's Great Demon-Peko and the Exploration Party of Five

Movie review by
Jennifer Green, Common Sense Media
Doraemon: New Nobita's Great Demon-Peko and the Exploration Party of Five Movie Poster Image
Cartoon violence in anime with friendship, courage themes.
  • NR
  • 2014
  • 109 minutes

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Educational Value

The movie is intended to entertain rather than educate.

Positive Messages

Adventures with friends can be fun and educational. Qualities like perseverance, courage, and kindness pay off. The creation of destructive weapons is at odds with a kingdom's ability to live in peace and harmony. Adults might wonder a bit about the portrayal of a threatening native species, the idea of a parallel evolutionary process, or the messages behind scientific advances being seen as threatening to peace and harmony.

Positive Role Models & Representations

A group of friends protects each other with a "one for all, and all for one" mentality. Peko helps his human friends in a myriad of ways, including consoling them when they're down and finding lost objects. Despite insecurities, Peko bravely returns to the dog kingdom to fight for his right to his inherited throne. To help Peko, Nobita and the gang display bravery and loyalty. Evil dog soldiers enslave, starve, and kill fellow dogs.

Violence & Scariness

Nobita falls in his bedroom, hits his head on the floor, and passes out. A friend seems to emerge beaten up after meeting with his mom. Kids, Peko, and Doraemon are chased and/or threatened -- but not hurt -- by a leopard, snake, rhinoceros, gorilla, crocodiles, lions, dog soldiers using a variety of weapons, volcanic steam, and people with flaming swords. Peko recalls the coup against his father, king of the dog kingdom, which led to his father's death by poisoning, his own ousting from the dog kingdom after being pushed off a cliff, the imprisonment of friends, the imprisonment of his fiancée, and the enslavement of other dogs. The dog kingdom's savior, an enormous statue, battles and defeats the dog soldiers' army.

Sexy Stuff
Language

"Damn."

Consumerism

Japanese food products mentioned.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Doraemon: New Nobita's Great Demon-Peko and the Exploration Party of Five offers the same type of childhood adventure and messages of friendship as the original Doraemon series. That said, you can expect a few more scares, mostly in the form of cartoon violence. Characters are chased, threatened, and/or compromised by a variety of animals, weapons, and natural terrains. That could upset the youngest viewers, who may also be slightly confused by the storyline, which suggests that humanoid dogs evolved at the same time as humans. A single use of "damn" is the extent of language in a subtitled version.

User Reviews

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What's the story?

DORAEMON: NEW NOBITA'S GREAT DEMON-PEKO AND THE EXPLORATION PARTY OF FIVE sends Nobita, Doraemon, and their gang of friends on a jungle adventure. Nobita (voiced by Megumi Ohara) is hunting for summer excitement when he comes upon what he believes is an abandoned dog, which he adopts and names Peko (Yû Kobayashi). When satellite photos that Doraemon (Wasabi Mizuta), Nobita's robot cat, is taking of the jungles of Africa reveal a mysterious statue, the gang thinks they've found a mission. Using Doraemon's magical powers, they travel to Africa, where they face a series of dangers, both real and perceived. Peko finally reveals himself to be a humanoid dog who can talk and walk upright. He's also the rightful heir to the throne of a secret dog kingdom that's currently under the rule of evil soldiers wielding powerful weapons. The group decides to put their own lives at risk to help Peko defeat the bad dogs, save his kingdom, reunite with his fiancée, and take back the throne.

Is it any good?

This fun anime movie combines adventure, exotic locations, and magic in a tale about friendship and courage. Doraemon: New Nobita's Great Demon-Peko and the Exploration Party of Five has moments of great tenderness, especially seen in the character of Peko, as well as clever humor, like when Nobita uses Doraemon's magic portal to leave Africa and sneak back home to hide his grades from his mom.

Adults might wonder a bit about the portrayal of a threatening native species, the idea of a parallel evolutionary process, or the messages behind scientific advances being seen as threatening to peace and harmony. But, through children's eyes, this adventure into Africa and the discovery of a hidden dog kingdom is full of amazement and wonder. When the gang fends off evil soldiers and restores kind, brave Peko to his rightful throne by "moving the heart" of the prophetic statue, the literal and figurative messages are clear.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how each individual character in Doraemon: New Nobita's Great Demon-Peko and the Exploration Party of Five contributes to the group's safety and wellbeing. Do they work well as a team? 

  • Doraemon, a robot cat from the future, has a collection of magical tools that gives the gang special powers to fight, hide, time travel, and alter reality. If you could have any magical tool, what would you want it to do?

  • Which parts of the movie were scary to you? Why? How much scary stuff can young kids handle?

  • Does the animation style of this film remind you of others you've seen? How does the film compare to the Dorameon series, if you've seen it?

Movie details

Themes & Topics

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