Everybody Loves Somebody

Movie review by
S. Jhoanna Robledo, Common Sense Media
Everybody Loves Somebody Movie Poster Image
Romcom about love, Mexican family has drinking and sex.
  • PG-13
  • 2017
  • 100 minutes

Parents say

age 14+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Family is very important, even if you don't always get along with everyone. Breaking up with someone doesn't mean that you can't stay friends. You can't judge other people's relationships. And love arrives in ways you don't always expect. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Though she's clearly troubled by a long-ago breakup and suffers from an inability to trust new relationships/commit to them, Clara is kind and good and deeply values her family. In fact, almost everyone in this film means well. 

Violence

Arguments, but they don't get too heated. 

Sex

The main character picks up random guys when she's drunk. One scene shows people fooling around in bed, nude; a man's bare chest and a woman's bare back are visible. In another scene, a woman starts to pleasure herself before she's interrupted (again, nothing graphic shown). Other scenes show women in their underwear. 

Language

Strong language is fairly infrequent but includes "a--hole," "blue balls," "hell," "s--t," and "f--k," said once by a child (language is said in Spanish and translated in the subtitles).

Consumerism

One of the main characters drives a Honda; another wears Crocs (which are called out by name).

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

The main character often hangs out in bars, frequently getting pretty drunk.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Everybody Loves Somebody is a generally charming Spanish-language (with English subtitles) romantic comedy about love and family. It deals with some mature themes, including abandonment, binge-drinking, hook-ups, and fear of commitment. The topics are handled with care and sensitivity, but the content is still most appropriate for teens and up. Couples are shown in sexual situations/making love, but nothing beyond bare shoulders, a bare back, and kissing is seen. In one scene, a woman starts to pleasure herself before being interrupted. There's also some swearing in Spanish that's translated in the subtitles, including "s--t" and "f--k," which is said once by a child. In the end, the movie has clear messages about the importance of family and love.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 13 and 15 year old Written bypkbos September 21, 2017

Great movie about real love, & life.

This is not your typical Disney, or American, movie. It's smart, funny and shows slightly exaggerated characters with heart. The cinematography is gorgeo... Continue reading

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's the story?

In EVERYBODY LOVES SOMEBODY, Los Angeles OBGYN Clara Barron (Karla Souza) is devoted to her patients and watching them grow their families. She also enjoys a close relationship with her mother and father (a longtime couple who are finally getting married in the fourth decade of their life together and who live just across the border in Mexico) and her sister, who's married and has a young son. But love is something Clara has yet to conquer: She prefers one-night stands with guys she meets at the bars where she goes to drink after long days at work. Her hook-ups aren't as complicated as the relationship she once had with Daniel (Jose María Yazpik), a fellow Mexican doctor who practically left her at the altar to join Doctors Without Borders. In need of a date to her parents' wedding, Clara invites a colleague, good-hearted pediatrician Asher (Ben O'Toole). It quickly becomes apparent that they share not just a profession but a strong chemistry. But when Daniel shows up unannounced at the wedding, Clara finds herself at a crossroads. 

Is it any good?

There's much to like, if not outright love, about this generally charming romcom. For starters, there's Souza, who's one of the more appealing female protagonists to grace a romantic comedy in a while. Though Everybody Loves Somebody still deals in cliches -- can't a successful professional with a loving family be happy without a relationship? -- it at least tries to do so in a subtler manner, presenting Clara and her dilemmas with Daniel and Asher in slightly more textured ways. Daniel isn't the typical commitment-phobe ex, and Asher doesn't exist simply to sweep Clara, who's ambivalent about long-term relationships, off her feet.

The supporting actors and subplots are strong, too. A scene involving Clara's sister and her husband is almost worth the price of admission alone, if only for its uncanny depiction of love between a long-married couple who've weathered the small-but-significant erosions that daily parenting and partnering exacts -- but also rely on the deep bond that it forges. Also key in the romcom genre is the music, and that's unfortunately one of Everybody Loves Somebody's weak spots. Practically every song used in the film is cribbed from romcoms that have come before that it's clearly is trying to evoke, from Bridget Jones' Diary to (500) Days of Summer. With so much going for it, Everybody Loves Somebody didn't need to try quite so hard. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how Everybody Loves Somebody deals with the subject of romantic love. Is it with the typical rose-colored glasses of many romcoms, or is it more complex?

  • How is sex portrayed? Is it taken seriously? Parents, talk to your teens about your own values regarding sex and relationships.

  • What role does drinking play in Clara's life? Are there realistic consequences when she overdoes it? Why is that important?

  • Does Clara's family ground her or confine her? Does the way the family is portrayed feel authentic?

Movie details

For kids who love romcoms

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate