Everybody Wants Some!!

Movie review by
Jeffrey M. Anderson, Common Sense Media
Everybody Wants Some!! Movie Poster Image
Raunchy but funny and thoughtful early '80s college comedy.
  • R
  • 2016
  • 116 minutes

Parents say

age 2+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 17+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Themes related to the value of both being yourself and finding the right team to be part of. But questionable behavior isn't punished, and even though rules are broken, there aren't any consequences.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Not a lot of obvious role model behavior, but characters do learn how to handle teasing and how to accept their own strengths and weaknesses. They also learn how to be on a team. Secondary characters are promiscuous and pursue many sexual partners.

Violence

Brief bar brawl. Painful-looking "knuckles" game, with some bleeding. Mosh pit at punk rock show, with pushing and shoving. Mud wrestling.

Sex

Secondary characters try to pick up partners throughout the story. Montage of brief, simultaneous sexual encounters/sex acts in a college boarding house. (Mostly kissing and groping/fondling.) Topless female; naked male bottoms. Lots of kissing. Heavy, frequent sex talk and innuendo. Shirtless males, males in jock-straps. Man admires his own bottom in tight pants ("best cheese on campus"). Mud wrestling at a party.

Language

Near-constant language includes heavy use of "f--k," "s--t," motherf----r," "t-ts," "c--k," "a--hole," "bitch," "d--k," "f----t," "poontang," "semen," and "sack," plus "swear to f---ing God" and "Jesus Christ" (as an exclamation).

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

College-age characters often smoke pot (via joints and bongs) and almost constantly drink beer, as well as some hard alcohol.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Everybody Wants Some!! is a comedy from Richard Linklater that can be seen as a successor to his cult classic Dazed and Confused. Language is extremely strong, running the gamut from "f--k" to "s--t" and many others. College-age characters drink beer (and sometimes harder alcohol) and often smoke pot (bongs, joints). Men try to pick up women and sometimes succeed, kissing and sleeping casually with many of them. A topless woman is shown, as are men's naked bottoms; there's also plenty of ogling, innuendo, groping, etc. Violence is limited but includes a brief bar brawl, pushing and shoving in a mosh pit at a punk show, a painful-looking "knuckles" game (with bleeding, swollen knuckles), and mud wrestling. Though it's full of mature content, it's also funny and irresistible, with some soulful passages and "be yourself"/"join a team" messages.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Kid, 9 years old April 5, 2016

Hilarious, but uneven and unoriginal comedy has lots of sex, language, drugs.

This racy and sometimes hilarious and entertaining drama comedy takes place in Texas, 1980 where a Texas university collage freshman named Jake is accepted into... Continue reading

What's the story?

In 1980, Jake (Blake Jenner) is a freshman at a big Texas university -- and a new pitcher on the school's champion baseball team. In the days leading up to the first day of classes, Jake meets his teammates, including the charmingly verbose Finn (Glen Powell); the team's only black player, Dale (J. Quinton Johnson); and philosophical pot-smoker Willoughby (Wyatt Russell). They go to a disco, to a country bar, to a punk rock show, and to a party thrown by theater and dance students; drink great quantities of beer; and try to pick up girls. Occasionally, they even practice some baseball. Meanwhile, Jake meets someone he'd like to spend some quality time with, Beverly (Zoey Deutch), in spite of his teammates' razzing and teasing.

Is it any good?

With laid-back ease and an organic understanding of characters and dialogue, Richard Linklater (Boyhood) has crafted an excellent, breezy comedy, albeit one that showcases iffy behavior. The collegiate characters are unsupervised for the first time, sowing their wild oats, naïve in many ways but wise in others. It's like a more thoughtful version of Meatballs. In addition to talking about sex and playing jokes on one another, the characters discuss concepts of being yourself, as well as becoming part of a team.

Like its spiritual predecessor, Linklater's breakthrough Dazed and Confused, EVERYBODY WANTS SOME is virtually plotless, with the possible exception that we're rooting for hero Jake to win the girl, but it moves beautifully, reveling in time and place and character nuance and generally enjoying itself in particular and life in general. It's very funny, not a bit of it unnecessary or out of place, and you don't want it to end.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about Everybody Wants Some!!'s strong sexual content. Is it OK for guys to pursue so many different potential partners with sex as the sole objective? How is Jake different? Parents, talk to your teens about your own values regarding sex and relationships.

  • Why do you think the characters drawn to drinking and drugs? Does the movie make them look appealing? Are there any consequences for using them? Why is that important?

  • When the characters tease each other, is this just friendly razzing or is it bullying? How can you tell the difference?

  • How does the movie depict the year 1980? What was different about that year? What's still the same?

Movie details

For kids who love comedies

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