Full Frontal

Movie review by
Nell Minow, Common Sense Media
Full Frontal Movie Poster Image
Some vivid moments, but overall, just so-so.
  • R
  • 2002
  • 101 minutes

Parents say

age 17+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Violence

Character dies. Tense scenes.

Sex

Very explicit sexual situations and references.

Language

Extremely strong language.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Drinking, smoking, and drug use.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that as the title indicates, this movie includes explicit nudity, explicit and varied sexual references and situations, and very strong language. A character dies, apparently from auto-erotic asphyxiation. Characters drink and smoke and eat hash brownies. There are tense emotional scenes. Parents may want to see the film themselves before deciding whether it's appropriate for teen viewing.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 9 year old Written bywillowfaierie August 14, 2009

ok

it taught me not to prejudice. Dana watched that at age 13.

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What's the story?

FULL FRONTAL is less a story than a series of moments, variations on the themes rather than a narrative. Digital and analog images alternate as we go into and out of a movie within a movie, even a movie within a movie within a movie, performed by actors playing actors. Several different stories overlap and intersect. Alice (Catherine Keener) is unhappily married to writer Carl (David Hyde Pierce). Alice's sister, Linda (Mary McCormack), is flirting online with Brian (Rainn Wilson), Carl's co-author. Linda is having an affair with Calvin (Blair Underwood), an actor who is currently playing the part of an actor named Nicholas who is playing the part of a sidekick to a detective played by Brad Pitt (playing himself). In his movie, Nicholas becomes romantically involved with a journalist named Catherine (Julia Roberts), who works at the same magazine that Carl works for in what sort of passes for real life in Full Frontal. Then it starts to get confusing. Themes and images flicker through several levels. In the end, just as one set of fictions are abandoned in favor of reality, a fiction at a deeper level is revealed.

Is it any good?

FULL FRONTAL is a small, messy, improvised, non-linear film filled with intimate conversations about love, sex, boundaries, longing, and voyeurism. It recalls director Steven Soderbergh's earlier film sex, lies, and videotape.

The movie has many wonderful moments and many marvelous lines. But it does not have the improvisational brilliance of the Christopher Guest movies and comes off more like an actor's studio workshop than a film. The whole is less than the sum of its parts, but some of those parts are remarkably vivid and intriguing.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about why Soderburgh told the story this way and what a movie they would make with their friends and families would be like.

Movie details

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