Go for It!

Movie review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Go for It! Movie Poster Image
Dance drama has rhythm but fails to inspire.
  • PG-13
  • 2011
  • 105 minutes

Parents say

age 15+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 14+
Based on 4 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Although the movie has positive messages about being brave enough to reach for a goal, friendship, and family, they're sometimes overshadowed by family dysfunction and poor choices. Cultural differences, racism, and the immigrant experience are also themes of the movie.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Carmen is insecure, often has a bad attitude, and is disrespectful to her parents and teacher. Her parents are loving but appear ill equipped to handle their adult children, all of whom live at home. Mr. Marin has good intentions but fails to connect with his students.

Violence

There are many explosive family arguments, which often lead to pushing, shoving, and punching. One cast member is in an abusive relationship. Someone is shown being strangled.

Sex

Some strong sexual innuendo, and characters take off their clothes, but no nudity is visible. Frequent lewd references to body parts and sexual acts.

Language

Fairy frequent use of words like "piss" and "s--t," plus one "f--k" and Spanish curse words.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Drinking (beer) is visible at clubs. References to underage drinking. One scene features characters using drugs (acid).

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this drama about a troubled Latina who turns to dance as a way of finding direction in her life has positive messages about self-confidence and education, but they're sometimes overshadowed by family dysfunction and poor choices. Expect some strong language (including "s--t," "f--k," and Spanish curses), sexual imagery (though no nudity), arguments, and physical violence (including murder), drinking, and some drug use. The immigrant experience and racism are also briefly discussed.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bychicagoshowbiz May 25, 2011

Go For It the movie and the Critic that never was!

I don't know what movie you went to see? But the movie I saw did not have Cussing, acid drug use, underage drinking and I don't know where there was a... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written byMc876423 August 20, 2014

Go For It

This movie isn't worth watching!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! This movie have some positive messages about friendship, family and reaching your goals. Carmen isn'... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written bymzJenkins May 21, 2011
i just don't like it,i think that it is so lame and yall should be ashamed to make anything like this!!

What's the story?

Carmen Salgado (Aimee Garcia) is a troubled Latina junior college student with a bad attitude and a passion for hip-hop dance. She spends her days juggling school work, a job at a local bodega, practicing with a local dance crew, and hanging out at local underground dance clubs with her best friend Gina (Gina Rodriguez) and dance crew leader Loli (Jossara Jinaro). Despite her desire for some direction in her life, Carmen's insecurity keeps her from following teacher Frank Marin’s (Al Bandiero) advice to apply to a California arts college and contributes to her being distracted by her non-Latino boyfriend, Jared (Derrick Denicola). She also struggles with the traditional family dynamics that guide her working-class immigrant family, including her parents (Gustavo Mellado and Liliana Montenegro), adult brothers Jesse (Andres Perez-Molina) and Pablo (Louie Alegria), and little sister Cecy (Safia Hannin). But in the end, she realizes that she needs to find the inner strength to go after her dream.

Is it any good?

GO FOR IT! tells an all-too-familiar tale about a young woman turning to dance as a way of overcoming economic and social limitations. It’s a positive message, but thanks to some underdeveloped plot lines, viewers aren’t given the opportunity to get to know and be motivated by the movie's characters. Meanwhile, the film’s dance sequences, which are mostly choreographed battles between female crews, are both limited and over-edited.

Teen audiences may identify with some of Carmen's struggles, particularly when it comes to finding the courage to reach for a dream. Some will also be able to identify with her family’s struggle with the competing cultural values that often define the Latino experience and appreciate the context of the movie's messages about inner strength and the importance of getting an education. But overall, the film fails to exude enough positive energy and excitement to promote its messages in a way that's both gratifying and inspirational.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the movie's messages. Are they strong enough to come through despite the sometimes-iffy content? How do they compare to the messages in other dance-centric dramas you've seen?

  • What are some of the ways that the film addresses stereotypes? How do these stereotypes factor into the way that Carmen feels about herself and about the way she looks at the world? What about the way the world sees her?

  • Why do you think Carmen is often defensive and disrespectful? Why do you think Mr. Marin is interested in helping her?

Movie details

For kids who love dancing

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate