Hatfields & McCoys

 
(i)

 

Tense, violent epic finds human side of legendary conflict.
Golden Globe
  • Review Date: May 28, 2012
  • Rated: NR
  • Genre: Western
  • Release Year: 2012
  • Running Time: 290 minutes

What parents need to know

Positive messages

Intense family loyalty is the best aspect of these warring clans, though that loyalty is prized over common sense, forgiveness, and kindness. Characters talk a lot about things like honor and respect, but the wanton disregard for human life sends another message. Nonetheless, the strife between the families is not glamorized and there are devastating consequences for every foolish or violent action.

Positive role models

Characters are realistically complex; it's hard to tell the "good" characters from the "bad" since they'll do something unspeakably evil right after acting nobly. Evildoing is always swiftly punished and every act has consequences; the audience also understands why these characters are so vengeful and violent even as you may shout "No! No!" at the screen.

Violence

Gore is not at horror-movie levels, but the violence depicted is extremely disturbing, i.e. the sudden violent death of family members, young children who discover their father's dead body, wartime casualties (not much blood is shown) including a young boy, a murder that ends up with the deceased stabbed in the crotch, a group of murderers surrounds a sleeping family and shoots into the house, then burns it to the ground.

Sex

A forbidden romance fuels much of the resentment between the two families. The young lovers are shown slipping into bed together with implied nudity; later, the woman says it was her "first time." That same character ends up pregnant and abandoned by her family. Married characters are shown kissing and discussing lovemaking in terms that may embarrass some families: "Spill your seed outside me as I cannot bear another birth."

Language

Characters curse frequently and colorfully: "Go piss on your Yankee jacket," "those s--theel McCoys." One character is accused for using his dog as a "whore" and "fornicating" with it. Kids may also learn vintage insults and curses like "you're a huckleberry over a persimmon" or "consarn it." 

Consumerism
Not applicable
Drinking, drugs, & smoking

Multiple scenes take place in saloons and the drunken characters make awful decisions. Anse Hatfield chews tobacco and spits brown streams frequently; many characters smoke.

Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that Hatfields & McCoys is an epic, six-hour saga that centers on a bloody feud between two families. The film opens mid-Civil War battle, and the tension never lets up, as two former comrades-in-arms fall into a dispute that leads to a huge squabble between their families. The violence is frequent and disturbing: A young boy, wounded in battle, begs to be shot and put out of his mercy; family members you've gotten to know are suddenly and brutally murdered; women and children cry pitifully at the death of family patriarchs. However, the violence isn't one bit glamorized, but instead has real emotional weight that will convince most viewers that the entire feud was something ridiculous that got out of hand. Parents can use the miniseries to illustrate a great number of useful ideas, such as duty, loyalty, and the human cost of conflict. As well as the simmering violence, there are some sexy scenes that may make some families uncomfortable, chief amongst them a scene with two lovers having illicit sex in the same room as a sleeping young girl, and one where a wife asks her husband to "spill his seed" outside of her body so that she doesn't become pregnant.

What's the story?

Devil Anse Hatfield (Kevin Costner) and Randall McCoy (Bill Paxton) are Civil War comrades at the beginning of the six-hour miniseries HATFIELDS & MCCOYS, the historically accurate saga of a legendary feud between two families along the Tug River in Kentucky and West Virginia. First Hatfield's desertion, than a series of double crosses and reprisals, sets a deadly chain of events into motion as Hatfields murder McCoys and then McCoys murder Hatfields in the name of honor and family loyalty. A true-to-life subplot involves a Romeo-and-Juliet relationship between Roseanna McCoy (Lindsay Pulsipher) and Johnse Hatfield (Matt Barr). Hatfield impregnates McCoy out of wedlock, and after the two families refuse their request to marry, abandons her for her cousin, Nancy McCoy (Jena Malone). That betrayal and Johnse's relationship with Nancy figures into the climactic ending of both the miniseries and the real-life feud, as vengeful Hatfields shoot up and then burn the McCoy family house to the ground.

Is it any good?

QUALITY
 

Civil War buffs in particular will be panting over all the old timeyness of Hatfields & McCoys. Horses! Really long guns! Fireworks that are produced by putting gunpowder on a tree stump and then hitting it with an axe! The filmmakers don't make a fetish of the times; this is not Colonial Williamsburg, televised. But it does give a particular shine to the proceedings, as does the knowledge that what the viewer is watching really happened. Though the show calls to mind The Sopranos, the true-life factor makes all the ugliness more palatable.

There is also a lot of cinematic candy to make the brutality and dirt sweeter, most particularly the setting in rolling Kentucky hills and the easy-on-the-eyes actors playing Roseanna McCoy and Johnse Hatfield. You could imagine them appearing in the Civil War version of Tiger Beat. As the family patriarchs, Paxton and Costner give emotional weight to the drama; they just seem like guys that a bunch of goofy family members would want to listen to. And as Sally McCoy, Randall McCoy's wife, Mare Winningham is so appealing that the very end of the story is unbearably poignant, effectively hammering home the "it wasn't worth it" message of the series. Meaty, realistic, and affecting, Hatfields & McCoys grabs the viewer on a level no history textbook could match.

Families can talk about...

  • Families can talk about the roots of the Hatfield/McCoy conflict, which often centered on positively ridiculous items such as a stolen pig. The McCoys saw the conflict as being over honor, not the pig. Is there a time in your life when you've fought over something other saw as silly but you saw as worthwhile, maybe even noble?

  • In trying to get back at their rivals, the Hatfields and McCoys each lost many beloved family members. Considering the price they paid, was the feud worth it? Can you think of any other examples from recent history or from your own life when you "won the battle, yet lost the war?"

  • Hatfields & McCoys make it difficult for the viewer to decide which characters are the heroes and which the villains. Do you see differences in the way the Hatfields and the McCoys are characterized through dialogue, costumes, music or other cues? Why do you think the filmmaker chose not to take sides in the feud by depicting one side as noble and right?

Movie details

DVD release date:July 31, 2012
Cast:Bill Paxton, Jena Malone, Kevin Costner
Director:Kevin Reynolds
Studio:Sony Pictures
Genre:Western
Topics:Brothers and sisters, History
Run time:290 minutes
MPAA rating:NR
Award:Golden Globe

This review of Hatfields & McCoys was written by

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Parent Written byArtie Shaul May 29, 2012
 

Don't use God's Name as they did.

Of all the words they could use. Why on earth do they mess up a good movie by using the Lord's name in vain. Why do movies have to say the G.D. words. It could be a better movie without using God's Name. I wouldn't want to be the one that was using God's name as they use it. Had to quit watching. I like the actors that are playing in the movie. They just don't have to use our God's name as they did. May God forgive them. For they don't know what they do. God's Name is to be Praised and worship. Not as they use it. For God is worth of all our praises. You wouldn't be here without God. Judgement is coming.
Teen, 13 years old Written bymoviewatcher12345687 September 11, 2012
 

great film

Great film. Strong violence and language some smoking and drinking and brief sex scenes. Great for 12 or 13 year olds.
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
Adult Written bysarge123 February 5, 2015

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