Hell & Back

Movie review by
Jeffrey M. Anderson, Common Sense Media
Hell & Back Movie Poster Image
Incredibly vulgar, unfunny animated movie; don't bother.
  • R
  • 2015
  • 86 minutes

Parents say

age 16+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

age 17+
Based on 6 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

The characters don't really learn anything; in fact, bad behavior seems to be rewarded.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The characters aren't very likable or admirable. They don't work well together, and they don't even seem to be friends.

Violence

Repeated story about a tree raping a man. Characters are chased by demons.

Sex

Strong, constant sexual innuendo/references. A very large naked demon-woman is shown; a character briefly licks her breasts. Brief image of a photo of genitals on a phone. A man starts to make out with his grown daughter. Scantily clad female characters, with "upskirt" shots of undies. A female character removes her underthings from beneath her clothes.

Language

Strong, constant language includes "f--k," "s--t," "p---y," the "N" word, "c--k," "t-ts," "a--hole," "balls," "bitch," "d--k," "ass," "damn," "vagina," "breasts," "queef," "balls," "sperm/testes," "whore," "douche," "idiot," "butt," and "Jesus Christ" (as an exclamation).

Consumerism

Frequent mentions of brand names include Barnes & Noble, Pizza Hut, Taco Bell, Strawberry Quik, Dell and Mac computers, Sybian vibrating chair, Red Bull, and Walgreens.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Characters go crazy for Devil's Brew and instantly become addicted. Characters do "whippets" (sucking on a whipped cream dispenser to get the nitrous). Reference to crystal meth.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Hell & Back may be a stop-motion animated movie, but it's definitely not for kids. Characters swear a blue streak ("f--k," "s--t," and much more), and there are nonstop sexual references/innuendoes/jokes (as well as other bodily function humor). Attractive female characters are shown in skimpy clothing (with views up their skirts), and a very large female demon is seen naked. There's a little blood and some chase scenes, but the movie is more about verbal than the visual. Teens who see this will unfortunately learn about "whippets" -- i.e. sucking on a whipped-cream dispenser to get a nitrous high. There's also a highly addictive, fictitious drink called Devil's Brew and other drug references. And if all of that wasn't enough, it's not even the slightest bit funny.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byErin N. March 23, 2018

Made for mature audiences

It's a vulgar movie made for more mature audiences just as some shows such as those on adult swim are made.
Adult Written byPizza G. June 3, 2017

Ribald, offensive animation with unlikable characters and dumb storytelling; OK for teens

Some kids may be able to derive a few laughs from Hell and Back's inane, often immature humor. But here's the catch; it isn't for kids. Go figure... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written byrebo344 January 6, 2016

An all time low for adult films.

Hell & Back is hell to go through. The animation and Bob Odenkirk are the only saving grace in this garbage. I mean, even South Park: Bigger, Longer and... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written byAndrewMc January 21, 2016

What's the story?

Three friends work at a dilapidated amusement park that's on the verge of going out of business. Remy (voiced by Nick Swardson) finds an ancient book with images of a weeping devil, and he makes a blood pact with Curt (Rob Riggle) over a mint. When Curt breaks it, he's sucked into hell, and Remy and Augie (T.J. Miller) go in after him. A pretty half-demon, Deema (Mila Kunis), offers to help them find their friend if they'll help her find Orpheus (Danny McBride). Meanwhile, the devil (Bob Odenkirk) is having problems of his own, with a confusing bureaucracy and an unrequited crush on an angel (Susan Sarandon).

Is it any good?

It's a wonder how this stinker of a script -- packed with foul language, sex references, and scatological jokes -- attracted such a strong cast in the first place. And the finished film is no better. Presumably inspired by such filthy, funny features as South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut (1999) and Team America: World Police (2004), HELL & BACK desperately clings to swearing and bodily functions for its humor, and it emerges with not a single laugh.

The stop-motion animation is colorful and must have taken a great deal of work, but the result still looks rushed and cheap. The characters fall completely flat; no friendship or teamwork seems to exist between the "friends," and, really, it's hard to care much about any of these awful characters. (If anything, Odenkirk's devil is probably, ironically, the most appealing character.) Not even Miller whose voice work in Big Hero 6 and the How to Train Your Dragon movies is so lovable, can help here.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about Hell & Back's sex humor/references? Does it represent sex in a positive light? What audience do you think the jokes are aimed at?

  • Are women objectified in this movie? Are there any worthy female role models?

  • Does the movie glorify drug and alcohol use? If so, how? What would real-life consequences be?

  • Did you find the movie funny? What kind of humor does it use? What other kinds of humor are there? Which kind(s) do you prefer? Why?

  • This is an animated movie that's aimed at adults; why are animated movies generally considered to be for kids?

Movie details

For kids who love comedy and animation

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