Holiday in the Sun

Movie review by
Barbara Shulgas..., Common Sense Media
Holiday in the Sun Movie Poster Image
Olsen twins save artifacts in dopey vacation movie.
  • G
  • 2001
  • 87 minutes

Parents say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

Kids say

age 6+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Staying at an expensive hotel in the Bahamas is probably a pleasant way to vacation.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Since no one talks or acts the stilted and moronic way that the people in this movie talk and act, actual human behavior cannot be compared to any behaviors exhibited in the movie.

Violence & Scariness
Sexy Stuff

Attractive girls and women wear bikinis, and men wear swimming trunks. Teenage girls and boys kiss.

Language
Consumerism

The Atlantis Hotel in the Bahamas, where the movie appears to have been shot, is repeatedly mentioned, and we frequently see lush views of the hotel’s distinctive profile.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Holiday in the Sun is a 2001 Olsen twins movie in which the sisters act boy-crazy while they attempt to stop smugglers of ancient artifacts during their vacation in the Bahamas. There is some brief kissing between teens and a focus on bikini-ed bodies as well as consumerism (the Atlantis Hotel in the Bahamas, where the movie appears to have been shot, is repeatedly mentioned, and we frequently see lush views of the hotel’s distinctive profile). This muddled, brain-numbing title is one of the worst in the series; for die-hard fans only.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Kid, 10 years old January 27, 2018

love it

i realy like this movie its safe for kids to watch it has a lettle bit of kissing

What's the story?

Alex (Ashley Olsen) and Madison (Mary-Kate Olsen) go on vacation with their parents to the Bahamas. Griffen (Austin Nichols), the son of family friends, has long had a crush on Madison, but she fixates on the intellectually challenged Scott (Billy Aaron Brown). Like Cyrano, Griffen tries to give Scott a crash course in Madison’s favorite books and astronomy, but when Scott asks her what her sign is, Madison realizes that Griffen is the better man. Alex also goes after an attractive boy, and a bossy girl with a powerful father unsuccessfully tries to redirect the boy’s attentions. The smuggling of native ancient artifacts is worked into a subplot.

Is it any good?

HOLIDAY IN THE SUN doesn’t even meet the qualifications for dreadful. Parents should worry that their children's brains may shrivel at the merest exposure to this movie. Attempts at artsy photography provide the movie's most inadvertently comic moments, and the twins’ habit of speaking knowingly to the camera, as if sharing intimacies and private jokes with the audience, is both ineffective and smarmy. There's a know-it-all quality to the Olsen’s collective presence that also rankles, as it displays an obliviousness to the triviality of the interests and values of the characters they play. Olsen twin movies purport to value education, but the plots generally revolve around targeting cute boys and having as much mindless fun as possible in expensive-to-get-to places. Glaringly absent from their unblemished universe is any sign of the kind of teens for whom a Bahamas vacation would be an unaffordable luxury.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the movie's premise. Is it supposed to be believable? Why, or why not?

  • Why do some countries have laws that prohibit ancient artifacts from being taken across their borders? Do you think this is a good idea?

  • Why are Olsen twins movies still popular? What is the appeal of these sisters?

Movie details

For kids who love to travel

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate