Ibiza

Movie review by
Brian Costello, Common Sense Media
Ibiza Movie Poster Image
Sex and drugs in stale, raunchy romcom.
  • NR
  • 2018
  • 94 minutes

Parents say

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Kids say

age 15+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

No positive messages. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

No positive role models. 

Violence

When one of the lead characters is having sex with a man in a Jacuzzi at a party, the wife of the man catches her and chases her with a knife. A young woman who gives the lead characters a ride to a nightclub drives blindfolded while high and drunk. 

Sex

Gratuitous female nudity -- while sunbathing at a topless beach, the lead characters classify the various types of breasts they see. Sex and sexual references are a frequent topic of discussion. Lead character has sex -- shown in bed, no nudity. Character has oral sex while in a Jacuzzi. Another character is frequently sexting with a man she has met -- taking pictures of her breasts, receiving pictures of the man's penis. Upon checking into a hotel room, the lead characters discuss how hotel rooms often have sperm stains revealed under a black light, which turns into a joke when it's revealed sperm stains are splattered everywhere in the hotel room. 

Language

Frequent profanity. "F--k" often used. "S--t," "p---y," "c--k," "tw-t," "d--k," "damn," "jizz," "douche bag." Frequent talk of sex and depictions of sex. One of the lead characters talks of wanting "old man sausage" in Speedos. 

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Frequent drug and alcohol use, leading to drunken behavior. Lead characters are often drunk and high on marijuana. Two of the lead characters are sold Adderall (after turning down a baggie of cocaine); this results in one of the characters finding a fitness room in the party, talking in a fast and agitated manner while leaving a voicemail message, and eventually passing out while still working out on an elliptical machine. Lead characters take Ecstasy at a nightclub. Lead character gets high on hashish at a party. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Ibiza is a 2018 raunchy "lost weekend" romcom in which Gillian Jacobs plays a New York publicist who cuts loose on a business trip in Spain and falls for a DJ. There's frequent profanity ("f--k" in particular), drug and alcohol abuse, talk of sex, sex acts, nudity, sexual situations, and an over-the-top scene in which one of the lead characters turns on the black light on her smartphone to reveal all the sperm stains covering just about everything in their hotel room. The lead character meets her DJ love interest when he helps her remove a large penis that someone had drawn on the side of her face while at a dance party. The young woman who gives the lead characters a ride to the nightclub drives blindfolded while high on cocaine and marijuana. One of the lead characters, after buying Adderall from a drug dealer at a party, ends up in a fitness room, riding an elliptical machine until she passes out. Overall, it's a raunchy sex comedy in the tradition of The Hangover and similar movies combined with the awkward interactions of the love interests in a romcom -- but the raunch is far more prevalent, making this only for mature older teens and up. 

User Reviews

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Teen, 14 years old Written bysunsetlovedreams June 12, 2018

wow... what did I just watch

wow. so this movie is equally good, awkward, and bad. but without further ado this is NOT for kids under 13 well ok i am 13 and I prob shouldn't have watch... Continue reading

What's the story?

Harper (Gillian Jacobs) plays a 30-something stressed-out New York low-level publicist toiling under a demanding and seemingly unstable boss (Michaela Watkins). When Harper is sent on a work trip to Spain to land a sangria account, her best friends Nikki (Vanessa Bayer) and Leah (Pheobe Robinson) convince Harper to bring them along by converting her first-class ticket into three coach tickets. Harper does this, and the women land in Barcelona, where they get drunk and high, sunbathe on a nude beach, then go to a rave. It's at the rave where Harper first meets Leo West, a world-famous DJ. While both awkward, the two hit it off, and so the ladies decide to follow Leo to his next gig -- at a rave in IBIZA. Arriving on Ibiza, Harper, Nikki, and Leah must not only find a way to get to the club where Leo is performing but also make sure that Harper makes her flight the next morning to get back to Barcelona to attend the meeting with the sangria reps. After spending an unforgettable night with Leo, Harper must decide if she wants to continue grinding out a living for her tyrannical boss or use this weekend as a way to make a new start in love and life. 

Is it any good?

Ibiza is proof positive that the "lost weekend" movies have become a trite formula. In these movies, amid beautiful scenery and endearing and/or violent locals, there's always the quirky off-kilter character whose eccentricity manifests itself through odd one-liners, the character whose sole motivation is the attainment of casual sex, and then the relatively normal, dry-humored cynic who has grown weary and neurotic from too many failed relationships. These characters are set loose in these unfamiliar habitats to get into weird trouble resulting in at least one gross-out scene. They ingest various intoxicants in liquid, pill, and powder form, make bad decisions, get into awkward sexcapades, then somehow by the skin of their teeth make it back to the States, where the bond of their friendship has grown even stronger. 

That said, the enjoyment one derives from Ibiza is inevitably dependent on whether or not the audience has grown tired of this formula. It's a decent movie in terms of the acting; Gillian Jacobs basically brings her character Mickey from the Netflix show Love to this movie. But the romcom aspect comes off as a little too forced and a little too convenient. Overall, it's a tired premise that we've seen before; older teens and adults can find better.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about "lost weekend" comedies in which characters cut loose from the stress and tedium of their day-to-day lives and engage in hedonistic acts they normally wouldn't do. What is the appeal of comedies like these? What are some other examples of movies with similar stories?

  • How is drug and alcohol use shown in the movie? Are there consequences? Do you think the movie glamorizes drug and alcohol use? Why, or why not? 

  • How is sex portrayed here? Do you think it's realistic? How are sexual situations used to heighten moments of comedy? 

Movie details

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