Ladrones

Movie review by
Yvonne Condes, Common Sense Media
Ladrones Movie Poster Image
Subtitled caper movie is silly fun; some violence, language.
  • PG-13
  • 2015
  • 98 minutes

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

People matter more than money or power. Doing what's right is more important than a big payout. A single mom talks about the importance of education and hard work.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Alejandro cares about helping people, but he does that by stealing from the rich. Santiago is trying to go straight after a life of crime, but he ends up helping Santiago. The townspeople have their own way of helping and caring for each other. Josefa is critical of her daughter but values education and hard work. Her daughter is brilliant, but she's also a hacker. The villain, Miranda, is just out for her own interests.

Violence

A robber breaks into a house, grabs a woman by the throat, pulls her hair, throws her to the ground, and then grabs her young adult daughter. Footage of shooting (like a Western); a few of the characters have guns and shoot them. One man is shot. Man burns hand with a lighter to prove he's tough and pulls his own nose with a pair of pliers. Man shot with a Taser.

Sex

Flirting and innuendo. A couple makes out. Woman chosen to be part of the heist because she's attractive. Guard watches girls in bikinis. 

Language

Insults like "d--khead." Swearing includes "bulls--t," "s--t," "bitchy."

Consumerism

One of the characters is on Despierta America. Chevrolet seen in a couple of scenes.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Man chews tobacco to look tough and chokes on it. People seen smoking cigarettes.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Ladrones, the sequel to 2007's Ladron Que Roba a Ladron, follows the first movie's heroes, Alejandro (Fernando Colunga) and Santiago (Eduardo Yanez), as they try to retrieve land grants stolen by a greedy villain from a town of hardworking families. Alejandro is a modern-day Robin Hood, stealing from the rich and giving to the poor, while Santiago is trying to stay honest after being a career criminal. There's some violence -- a woman is grabbed, thrown to the ground, and robbed, and there's an old-fashioned shoot out, a fist fight, and a man who's shot (non fatally) -- and a few flirty scenes and swearing ("s--t" is as strong as it gets), but overally there's less iffy content here than in the first film, and it's mostly warmhearted. In Spanish with English subtitles.

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What's the story?

Josefa (Carmen Beato) has been living on land that was stolen from her family more than 100 years ago. One day while gardening, she finds the original grant that proves her home really does belong to her -- along with the land grants that her great-grandfather was hiding for her neighbors. But as soon as Josefa has the grants in her hand, they're stolen in a violent robbery. Only two men can help her: the infamous Alejandro Toledo (Fernando Colunga) a modern-day Robin Hood, and his ex-partner, Santiago (Eduardo Yañez). With the help of the wacky townspeople, the two set off to get the land grants back from the evil and seductive Miranda (Jessica Lindsey).

Is it any good?

LADRONES is a light, amusing caper movie in which Colunga and Yanez reprise their roles from the 2007 comedy Ladron Que Roba a Ladron. This time they're helping Texas townspeople reclaim the land that was stolen from them more than a century ago. The two stars are charming and have good chemistry, and the townspeople are sufficiently wacky as their sidekicks.

Ladrones is cute, and there are a lot of nice elements and positive lessons: The townsfolk love each other, everyone's differences are embraced, and it's made clear that the wellbeing of those in need is more important than money. But it could be funnier for something positioned as a comedy. Still, families with older kids who like light comedy and caper movies may enjoy Ladrones.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the appeal of "Robin Hood" stories, where needy people are helped when someone takes something from the rich. Does that situation justify the fat that Alejandro breaks the law? Do the ends ever justify the means?

  • What role does violence play in the story? Does it have less impact because the movie's tone is largely light/comic? Does exposure to violent media desensitize kids to violence?

  • Jackie is brilliant and resourceful, but her mother constantly hassles her because she didn't go to Harvard. What impact does it have on kids if parents pressure them to be perfect?

Movie details

For kids who love comedies

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