Le Divorce

Movie review by
Nell Minow, Common Sense Media
Le Divorce Movie Poster Image
Not a frothy romantic comedy.
  • PG-13
  • 2003
  • 115 minutes

Parents say

age 13+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Violence

Murders (offscreen), attempted suicide.

Sex

Sexual references and situations, including adultery.

Language

Some strong language.

Consumerism

The Hermes Kelly bag is mentioned by name.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Drinking and smoking.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this movie has mature themes, sexual references, and situations, including adultery. There is some strong language. And there is an attempted suicide and serious (off-screen) violence.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byMovieMan101 April 9, 2008

LE DIVORCE

Just like the review states, I was expecting LE DIVORCE to be a frothy romantic comedy. But boy was I wrong. Sex-7: Sexual issues and situaions including adult... Continue reading
Adult Written bylisajmarshall April 9, 2008

What was the point?

This is a movie that seems to have lost its way. There were several interesting plot lines, but I kept asking myself, "Where is this headed? What is the... Continue reading

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What's the story?

Kate Hudson plays Isabel, a California girl arriving in Paris to help her pregnant sister Roxy (Naomi Watts). But just as Isabel arrives, Roxy's artist husband Charles-Henri (Melvil Poupaud) leaves. So Isabel and Roxy are set adrift in a culture and legal system that is foreign to them. But Isabel and Roxy do not know how to deal with the subtlety and indirection of the rest of Charles-Henri's family, led by his mother (Leslie Caron). They appear to be plotting to have a painting hanging in Roxy's apartment declared to be part of the marital assets to be divided in the divorce. Roxy says that the painting belonged to her family, who just loaned it to her for her apartment. But it now appears that the painting might be much more valuable than they had thought, and Charles-Henri's brother brings in a curator from the Louvre to authenticate it as a Georges de la Tour. The ambiguity of the painting's provenance (three different experts come to see it and all have different opinions) and its status as a marital asset parallels the precariousness Roxy and Isabel experience in their relationships.

Is it any good?

LE DIVORCE may look and sound like a glossy romantic comedy, but it is instead an uneven take on the culture clash between America and France. All of the performances sparkle and there are some witty and sharply observed moments. But the movie's own perspective becomes too ambiguous, especially when it veers into a tragedy that throws everything out of balance.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the way the different characters see and react to the same things -- for example, the painting, marital fidelity, discussion of sensitive topics. Is that due to differences in culture or to something else?

Movie details

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