Like Mike

Movie review by
Nell Minow, Common Sense Media
Like Mike Movie Poster Image
Lil Bow Wow in family friendly fantasy.
  • PG
  • 2002
  • 100 minutes

Parents say

age 7+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 7+
Based on 4 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive role models & representations

Diverse characters are friends and teammates.

Violence & scariness

Kids in peril (no one hurt), very mean treatment by adults.

Sexy stuff

Mild innuendo.

Language

Brief mild language

Consumerism
Drinking, drugs & smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that there is a surprising amount of abuse and cruelty by adults in this movie. Bittleman lies, cheats, calls Ox an idiot, and forces the children to sell candy outdoors late at night. He burns Murph's only photo of his mother. Some kids may be upset by the orphanage and by Tracey's estrangement from his father. Make sure kids know that they must stay away from power lines and lightning. And make sure that kids know that room service is not free!

User Reviews

Adult Written byjoshua martinez September 30, 2011

7 and up.

like mike is a good family fantasy movie and parents the only issue that like mike has is some brief language used the role models is the Diverse characters are... Continue reading
Kid, 10 years old July 23, 2012

My Teacher Made Us Watch It

My Teacher liked it but didn't hear the h*** in the movie. I ain't a fan.
Kid, 12 years old December 27, 2013

Funny, Good Basketball Movie 7/10

This is a pretty good basketball movie. I think that it has some positive messages for kids, and it didn't have too much swearing in it, only a little. The... Continue reading

What's the story?

Pint-size rap star Lil Bow Wow plays Calvin Cambridge, who lives in an orphanage run by a meanie named Bittleman (Crispin Glover). Like Little Orphan Annie, Calvin's sunny outlook and determination sustain him, though he wishes he had a family. His best pals are Murphy ("Jerry Maguire's" Jonathan Lipnicki) and Reg (Brenda Song). The orphanage bully, Ox (Jesse Plemons), pushes him around, but Calvin does not allow Ox to affect his view of himself. A pair of used sneakers in a box of donated clothes has the initials "MJ" and there is a rumor that they were worn by a tall, bald, pro basketball player when he was a kid. Ox throws them onto a telephone wire, but Calvin gets them down in the middle of a lightning storm. (Parents might want to warn kids that this would not be a wise thing to try in real life.) When Calvin and the shoes are hit by lightning, something very special happens. When Calvin wears the shoes, he can play "like Mike." Calvin ends up playing for pro team the Knights, originally as a publicity stunt, but then as a real member of the team. The other teammates are at first skeptical and hostile, but they learn to appreciate his contribution. Calvin's roommate and assigned mentor is Tracey Reynolds (Morris Chestnut), a loner who does not speak to his father and does not want to get close to anyone.

Is it any good?

LIKE MIKE has a formula intended for box-office heaven – a teen idol into a family-friendly fantasy. The best thing about the movie is its surprisingly able cast of supporting players, including Robert Forster as the coach and Eugene Levy as the team's publicist. Chestnut is real leading man material. LBW himself has a lot of charm. A number of NBA greats make brief appearances.

The script is right out of the Hollywood formula box, with everything from two different "shoes not there at the crucial moment" scenes and important lessons about teamwork to the winning shot going into the basket just as the buzzer goes off. It's a combination Air Bud and Absent-Minded Professor. The movie is oddly edited with some plot holes. We never find out what went wrong in Tracey's relationship with his father and we get very inconsistent information about his relationships with a couple of different women. The resolution with Bittleman is offscreen and unsatisfying, and many of the kids are still left without parents at the end of the movie.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about where the power really came from. Why did Calvin want a nickname? Why, when he wanted a family so badly, did Calvin reject some of the people who wanted to adopt him? What is a mentor, and how do you find one or become one? How much of what made Calvin a basketball star was in the shoes, and how much was in his heart?

Movie details

Themes & Topics

Browse titles with similar subject matter.

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate