Looney Tunes: Rabbits Run

Movie review by
Renee Schonfeld, Common Sense Media
Looney Tunes: Rabbits Run Movie Poster Image
Cartoon hijinks, music, and intrigue in modern Bugs tale.
  • NR
  • 2015
  • 73 minutes

Parents say

age 18+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Educational Value

Meant to entertain, not educate. Introduces Paris.

Positive Messages

Believe in yourself. Determination gets the job done.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Bugs defends and teams up with Lola Bunny; they're persistent, resourceful, and brave. Villains are comic, all seeking a magical perfume to attain power. Female characters have always been in short supply for Looney Tunes; giving Lola Bunny a central role is welcome, even if she can't help being a damsel in distress at times.

Violence & Scariness

Multiple sequences of cartoon mayhem: explosions, falls, whacks on the head, weapons fired, captures, narrow escapes, police chases, wild rides, and characters smashed, pummeled, and rolled over. All silly and exaggerated; no injuries.

Sexy Stuff

A few cartoon smooches.

Language
Consumerism

Part of the Warner Bros./Looney Tunes franchise, which include related games, toys, books, movies, TV, and numerous other products.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Looney Tunes: Rabbit Run is a full-length, animated feature made by the team that produced The Looney Tunes Show for television in 2011 to 2014. With only one story, as opposed to the many episodic Bugs Bunny compilation DVDs that are out there, this movie finds Bugs engaged in an adventure with Lola Bunny, a female character first introduced in 1996's Space Jam. The characters, including a profusion of other Looney Tunes long-lived creations -- Foghorn Leghorn, Daffy Duck, Marvin the Martian, Elmer Fudd, and more --  battle each other all the way to Paris in hopes of taking ownership of a single flower's essence, with much at stake. Plenty of cartoon action sees the characters getting squashed, falling from great heights, being fired upon with an array of blasting weapons, brawling, and even jumping out of a plane. It's all comic in nature with no casualties. For kids who understand real vs. pretend violence, it's simply cartoon mayhem as usual. Humor is an important part of this tale; even the bad guys are funny and exhibit their special quirkiness. Die-hard Looney Tunes fans, accustomed to the wit and wisdom, inventive animation, and satire found in the earlier Warner Bros. cartoons by Chuck Jones, Friz Freleng, and others may be disappointed, but this film still should entertain today's kids, especially those familiar with the latest TV program. 

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byPintemom April 15, 2016

Not as advertised

I thought this was a nice safe movie for my third fourth and five graders to watch but it was not at all what I expected. The movie is rife with homosexual ref... Continue reading

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's the story?

A perfume salesbunny, Lola (Rachel Ramras), desperately wants to create her own distinctive perfume in LOONEY TUNES: RABBITS RUN. What luck! Lola's dream coincides with the appearance of a special flower that blooms only once every 200 years in Mexico. The fragrance is awesome, and through a series of lucky circumstances, Lola gets the flower and mixes up a batch of odeur extraordinaire. But what Lola doesn't know is that one spray of the flower's mist makes its recipient invisible. When Lola and her new BFF, cab driver Bugs Bunny (Jeff Bergman, who handles several voices) set out for Paris to find a home for Lola's new scent, they learn that some very greedy folks want that flower and its power of invisibility. It's a series of battles, face-offs, and fun with invisibility as Lola and Bugs navigate their way from NYC to Paris. Foghorn Leghorn, Cecil the Turtle, Yosemite Sam, Mac and Tosh Gophers, Pepe LePew, Marvin the Martian, and Speedy Gonzalez all make appearances; and there are two musical numbers (one bland and forgettable; the other, a Broadway showstopper).

Is it any good?

Often funny with a decent story and lots of the Looney Tunes gang on board, this full-length movie with a 21st-century sensibility is fun for kids; however, Looney Tunes traditionalists beware. Based on TV series The Looney Tunes Show, in terms of animation, pace, music, and humor this film doesn't match up with the iconic, often culturally sophisticated cartoons of Bugs Bunny and company's long movie history. Plus, continuity from the old to the new is lacking (for example, Bugs appears to meet Daffy Duck for the first time here). On its own, though, there's enough for kids to like, with plenty of "slam-bam" cartoon action and some clever moments -- especially when Daffy or Mac and Tosh Gophers are in the house. This is an entertaining choice for kids who are comfortable with cartoon jeopardy and know the difference between real and cartoon violence.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about understanding the nature of cartoon violence. Does it make you laugh? Do you think too much violence, even in cartoons, can be a bad thing? Why, or why not?

  • For fans of Bugs Bunny and past Looney Tunes cartoons and characters (the franchise first appeared in the 1940s), how is this movie different from the earlier offerings? If you loved the old ones, can you accept this new version based on its own strengths?

  • If you've watched other Looney Tunes adventures, did it bother you that in this movie some old friends and old enemies seemed to meet for the first time? Why do you think the filmmakers chose to separate characters who have always been part of a cartoon "community"? Did you find it confusing when Daffy and Bugs met in a cab and didn't appear to know each other?

Movie details

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