MADE: The Movie

Movie review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
MADE: The Movie Movie Poster Image
Reality-inspired TV movie offers teens positive messages.
  • NR
  • 2011
  • 83 minutes

Parents say

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Kids say

age 13+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

The movie ultimately has positive messages about following your dreams and working hard to reach a goal, as well as not listening to what others think about you and being true to yourself. That said, some students get away with iffy behavior. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Tuba is very clear about who she is and what she wants and is willing to work hard to reach her goal. Other students are less admirable, but they're also depicted in a way that makes it clear that they're not intended to be role models.

Violence

Students throw food at Tuba and her friends.

Sex

Hugging, kissing, sexual innuendo, and references to sexual identity. Some discussion of women’s “booty," and choreography contains some butt shaking.

Language

“Bitch” is used to describe some of the high school girls.

Consumerism

MacBook computers are clearly visible throughout the movie. References to Facebook.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Underage drinking; one student is shown throwing up.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this upbeat TV movie based on the popular MTV reality series MADE offers teens strong positive messages about being yourself and working hard to realize your dreams. The content veers a little to the mature side: There's a fair bit of sexual content, including kissing and innuendo; there are also references to homosexuality, some strong language (notably "bitch"), and underage drinking (including one teen throwing up). The death of a parent is briefly discussed.

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Teen, 13 years old Written bymar7 September 27, 2011

What's the story?

Inspired by the popular MTV reality series MADE, MADE: THE MOVIE follows Bethanny “Tuba” Cooper (Cyrina Fiallo), an awkward, unpopular high school band member who wants to try out for the school’s cheerleading squad. When her popular brother, Marshall (Brett Dier), fails to change her mind, his girlfriend/cheerleading captain Andi (Rachel Skarsten) decides to help Tuba get ready for tryouts. It isn’t easy, especially when the girls' social circles reject them for working with each other. But along the way, Tuba and Andi learn a lot about each other -- and about realizing their own dreams.

Is it any good?

This upbeat movie highlights many of the positive themes that make MADE the series one of MTV's better offerings, including working hard to reach a goal and being brave enough to be yourself. It also points out the need to accept people’s differences and the importance of friendship.

Although some of the characters who behave in iffy ways don't necessarily have to face the consequences of their actions, overall the take away is a worthwhile one. Bottom line? The movie isn’t quit as good or inspiring as the series, but it offers an entertaining entry point to discuss some important issues -- including peer pressure and self-esteem -- with young teens.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the movie's messages. What is it saying about self-esteem and friendship?

  • How does the movie compare to the show? Do you like one more than the other? Why?

  • What are your family members' dreams/goals? What, if anything, is keeping you from pursuing some of them? Parents: How can you help support your kids’ efforts to reach their goals?

Movie details

For kids who love movies about teens

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