Mee-Shee: The Water Giant

Movie review by
Teresa Talerico, Common Sense Media
Mee-Shee: The Water Giant Movie Poster Image
Friendly father-son-sea monster movie.
  • PG
  • 2005
  • 95 minutes

Parents say

age 7+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

With the exception of two villains, characters generally behave in positive ways. The villains, however, commit a variety of crimes and immoral acts -- from vandalism and assault to kidnapping and possibly attempted murder. A young boy wanders off alone into a dangerous cliff area; he is later lightly reprimanded for his behavior. An otherwise loving father has a somewhat strained relationship with his son, but they develop a closer bond throughout the movie.

Violence & Scariness

A lake monster attacks two villains and destroys their boat in a fiery explosion; their deaths are not shown. A helicopter crashes into a lake; the pilot and passenger are temporarily trapped underwater. Kids fall into a deep hole/cave, but they make it out OK.

Sexy Stuff
Language

The word "hell" is used occasionally, such as in this exchange: "Custer -- that's a hell of a name for an Indian." "My father had a hell of a sense of humor."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that although this movie is geared toward kids, it does include some frightening scenes where the titular water creature attacks the movie's two villains and destroys their submarine with a flick of its tail; it's understood that both men don't survive. Also, these two villains are quite dangerous and don't seem to care about harming others who get in their way. They kidnap a boy, vandalize property, attack a boat full of people with a grenade launcher, and harpoon the monster. The movie also touches on a boy's loss of his mother, establishing that she died two years earlier and her death still affects both father and son. Finally, Mee-Shee is essentially a friendly monster, but it may appear scary at first to younger kids.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bytreygibson April 11, 2009
Seemed like lots of violence for being rated at age 7. Also there is a graphic fist fight and two scenes where people are hit on the head by objects and knocked... Continue reading

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What's the story?

An oil company has dispatched engineer Sean Campbell (Bruce Greenwood) to Canada to retrieve an expensive drillhead at the bottom of a lake using his specialized submarine. Sean and his son, Mac, learn of a water monster that's said to inhabit the lake, and is called Mee-Shee by the Native Americans. Mac, who wasn't thrilled over going to Canada because he missed a trip to Disney World, decides to look for Mee-Shee. What he finds is that the creature is a guardian angel of sorts, rescuing people from drowning and instinctively protecting them from two villains who arrive in town. Indeed, a threat looms over the area when a rival oil company hires two thugs to foil Campbell's attempts to salvage the drillhead, and the men will stop at nothing to achieve that goal.

Is it any good?

MEE-SHEE: THE WATER GIANT is a family-friendly movie that should delight kids with its compassionate lake monster, nifty submarines, and scenes of adventure in the remote Canadian wilderness. Meanwhile, its sensitive portrayal of the relationship between a father and his young son provides some tender moments. The movie sinks occasionally due to some overacting by minor characters, but overall it's entertaining and fun to watch.

Some suspense is lost by revealing Mee-Shee too quickly, but this may work better for younger viewers. A gargantuan combination of walrus, dinosaur, and dolphin, Mee-Shee is a little scary at first, but proves itself to be friendly, curious, and even playful. The movie features a number of suspenseful scenes -- underwater and on dry land. And Sean and Mac's experiences with Mee-Shee help them grow closer, probably more than a trip to Disney World ever could.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how Mee-Shee seems to instinctively know who the "good guys" and "bad guys" are. How does Mee-Shee protect and rescue people? How does Mee-Shee defend those same people against the movie's villains? Why is it important that the young boy not broadcast the fact that he has seen Mee-Shee? How does the film handle environmental issues, such as animal protection and the oil industry?

Movie details

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