My Little Pony Live: The World's Biggest Tea Party

Movie review by
Carrie R. Wheadon, Common Sense Media
My Little Pony Live: The World's Biggest Tea Party Movie Poster Image
Less engaging for young Pony fans in DVD form.
  • NR
  • 2008
  • 65 minutes

Parents say

age 18+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 8+
Based on 6 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Slight messages about working together, how helping can be fun, and how everyone makes mistakes and it's OK.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The horses work together to plan their tea party.

Violence & Scariness
Sexy Stuff
Language

One song has the lyric "shake your cutie" instead of "shake your booty."

Consumerism

Based on the popular toy line, of course. Books and DVDs are also available.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that My Little Pony Live: The World's Biggest Tea Party is a recording of a stage show that's especially geared toward kids ages 2-5 and fans of the toys. A few positive messages about working together and how it's OK to make mistakes are hidden in the plethora of songs. Parents may also notice that the lyrics of one popular disco tune are changed from "shake your booty" to "shake your cutie."

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Kid, 12 years old July 1, 2010

hi show

scary scary!!!
Kid, 10 years old August 8, 2012

Educational but shallow

This is pretty much a pile of crap hands down. G3 was the worst period and only proved that MLP was on it's last leg.

What's the story?

The My Little Pony pals are looking for something to do and end up deciding they want to do everything fun at once. The only way to do that is to have a big party -- THE WORLD'S BIGGEST TEA PARTY to be exact. Everyone offers to pitch in to make it a success, and kids in the audience get out their cardboard tea cups and sing "I'm a Little Teapot" together in anticipation. But not everyone is focused on helping with the party. Rarity (voiced by Cathy Weseluck) is too busy having fun at first to remember the streamers, and Pinkie Pie (Janyse Jaud) forgets the most important thing on the menu. Can the audience and a little magic help her find some tea?

Is it any good?

The draw for any toddler and preschooler is seeing their favorite toys in giant form, dancing and singing on stage. Which means that kids who love the toys would probably enjoy seeing The World's Biggest Tea Party live more than watching it on DVD. Without the audience-supplied cardboard tea cups and ladybugs in Bobby socks dancing up and down the aisles with party invitations, viewers are left with very little to get excited about.

Parents will definitely be bored; this isn't an enjoy-together experience. It takes the pastel ponies 18 minutes to introduce themselves (and what names: Tra La La? Sew-and-So?) and get to a song asking what they should do that day. At almost the halfway mark, they decide to have the tea party. And even though said party is in the Crystal Rainbow Castle in Unicornia, it's too late to impress. The only big dramatic development is that Pinkie Pie forgets the tea. Songs are plentiful and rather pointless; the only educational moment is when a song explains how tea comes from China, which is -- wow -- also the name of the tea cup.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about toys come to life. What do you think the main goal of My Little Pony Live: The World's Biggest Tea Party was -- to entertain kids or to get them wanting more Pony toys? Which of your favorite toys would you like to see large and on stage singing? Kids may want to make their own mini-stages and put on a play with their favorite toys.

  • What kind of party do you think your toys would like to have? How would everyone help with the preparations?

Movie details

For kids who love horses

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