Peter Pan (2000)

  • Review Date: October 7, 2005
  • Rated: NR
  • Genre: Family and Kids
  • Release Year: 2000
  • Running Time: 96 minutes

Common Sense Media says

Leap-out-of-your-seat fun; great intro to theater.
  • Review Date: October 7, 2005
  • Rated: NR
  • Genre: Family and Kids
  • Release Year: 2000
  • Running Time: 96 minutes

Age(i)

2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17

Quality(i)

 

What parents need to know

Positive messages

Stereotypical view of Native Americans, but they are portrayed as Peter's courageous allies, which was controversial when the play was written. Wendy is objectified as a "mother" and expected to care for all the males because she is female. Though forgiveable in a fantasy like this, the kids do run away from home with a strange boy.

Violence & scariness

Battles between the pirates, Native Americans, and the children. The children are captured, Peter is wounded, and Hook throws himself over to be eaten by a crocodile.

Sexy stuff
Not applicable
Language

No profanity, but Tinkerbell does call Peter a "silly ass" several times, which parents might explain means "donkey" in this context.

Consumerism
Not applicable
Drinking, drugs, & smoking
Not applicable

Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that kids will see some obviously staged fights, some dated stereotypes, and questionable behavior of the sort forgiveable in a fantasy. Kids will see battles between the pirates, Native Americans, and the children. The kids are captured, Peter is wounded, and Hook throws himself over to be eaten by a crocodile. A dated stereotype of Native Americans has them saying "ugh" a lot, but they are also portrayed as Peter's courageous allies, which was controversial when the story was written. Wendy is objectified as a "mother," and it is assumed, by her as well as the boys and the pirates, that her role is to care for males and kids. Though forgiveable in a fantasy like this, the kids do run away from home with a strange boy. There is no profanity, but Tinkerbell does call Peter a "silly ass" several times, which parents might explain was more commonly used to mean "donkey" when the story was written.

Parents say

Kids say

What's the story?

Former Olympic gymnast Cathy Rigby stars as Peter Pan in this Broadway production of the musical, filmed on stage. Led by Tinkerbell the fairy, Peter comes to the Darling nursery one night in search of his shadow. He meets Wendy, Michael, and John, and teaches them to fly. He then persuades them to return with him to Neverland to live with the Lost Boys, so that Wendy can be their mother, and make them pockets and tell stories. Peter rescues Tiger Lilly from the odious Captain Hook, and she rescues him from the rising tide, so they join forces against the pirates. Captain Hook plans to poison Peter, capture the children, make them walk the plank, and keep Wendy to be the pirates' mother. But Peter defeats the pirates and the Lost Boys return home with the Darlings to be adopted.

Is it any good?

QUALITY
 

Rigby is the best Pan seen on Broadway, far better than Mary Martin or the cutesy Sandy Duncan. Her dynamic and athletic performance is probably as close as a woman can come to portraying a boy, and her singing voice is powerful and clear. The flying is thrilling. Rigby swoops, tumbles, and spins through the air with reckless abandon, the theater scarcely seeming large enough to hold her. Most of the best musical numbers take place in the nursery -- the excitement often flags once the characters reach Neverland. But this production brings it flying back, with a breathtaking staging of the song "Ugg-A-Wugg," in which the Lost Boys and Indians unite, that has the cast drumming all over the stage.

There are problems. The British accents are distractingly bad. Close-ups of Rigby don't help bolster the illusion that she is a 10-year-old boy. Oddly, the Lost Boys are played by teens and adults as well; the only real children on the stage are John and Michael. Paul Schoeffler's plays Hook entirely for laughs, but has none of that villain's oily menace and swagger. But these are quibbles; updated for today's children, this PETER PAN will have them leaping out of their seats with excitement, singing the songs for days, and dreaming of flying.

Families can talk about...

  • Families can talk about the stereotypes and discuss what the play means. Why do the "Indians" in this play say "ugh" so much? What does the way the Native Americans are portrayed tell you about how they were regarded? What about Wendy? Why do you think everyone assumes she will take the role of "mother" to them if they can only capture or keep her? Do you think a modern girl would either expect or want to take care of all those boys? Or would she rather engage more in their adventures? What does the way Wendy is portrayed tell you about how girls and women were regarded when this story was written? What is the message of the play? Do you think that message is still relevant today, even if some of the other elements of the play are dated?

Movie details

Theatrical release date:October 10, 2000
DVD release date:October 10, 2000
Cast:Barry Cavanagh, Cathy Rigby, Theresa McCoy
Director:Gary Halvorson
Studio:A&E Home Video
Genre:Family and Kids
Run time:96 minutes
MPAA rating:NR

This review of Peter Pan (2000) was written by

About our rating system

  • ON: Content is age-appropriate for kids this age.
  • PAUSE: Know your child; some content may not be right for some kids.
  • OFF: Not age-appropriate for kids this age.
  • NOT FOR KIDS: Not appropriate for kids of any age.

Find out more

Quality

Our star rating assesses the media's overall quality.

Find out more

Learning ratings

  • Best: Really engaging; great learning approach.
  • Very Good: Engaging; good learning approach.
  • Good: Pretty engaging; good learning approach.
  • Fair: Somewhat engaging; OK learning approach.
  • Not for Learning: Not recommended for learning.
  • Not for Kids: Not age-appropriate for kids; not recommended for learning.

Find out more

About our buy links

When you use our links to make a purchase, Common Sense Media earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes. As a nonprofit organization, these funds help us continue providing independent, ad-free services for educators, families, and kids while the price you pay remains the same. Thank you for your support.
Read more

See more about how we rate and review.

What parents and kids say

See all user reviews

Share your thoughts with other parents and kids Write a user review

A safe community is important to us. Please observe our guidelines

Kid, 7 years old January 10, 2015
AGE
4
QUALITY
 

awesome

kids under 3 should not watch this movie. Two kids almost died and Peter almost kills himself on purpose and kids under three would not be interested in it.
Teen, 14 years old Written bybwayboy January 20, 2011
AGE
4
QUALITY
 

"Once You have found your way there you can never, never grow old"

This is amazing, I saw this live and I've been watching the DVD for years I love it. It's an amazing show with great songs, actors, sets and effects Everyone will love it.
Kid, 12 years old January 23, 2013
AGE
6
QUALITY
 

Awesome!

This is a wonderful play! I was in love with the world of Peter Pan when I was 5-7 and I found this movie thrilling and charming. I would reccomend this to anyone who has young children. There are a few parts that would be scary to little kids.
What other families should know
Too much violence

Poll

Did our review help you make an informed decision about this product?

Essential School Tools