Sinbad: The Fifth Voyage

Movie review by
Tracy Moore, Common Sense Media
Sinbad: The Fifth Voyage Movie Poster Image
Campy sci-fi adventure offers silly B-movie fun.
  • PG-13
  • 2014
  • 89 minutes

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Loyalty; strength in the face of adversity; perseverance; honor.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Most characters are simplistically good or evil; Sinbad is a caricature of heroism and traditional masculinity who risks his life to save, protect those he loves.

Violence

Sword fights; battling giant supernatural monsters with some stabbing, minor bloodshed; a giant crab bites a man's arm and it bleeds; a man beheads a woman who reveals herself as a vampire, and her head dissolves into sand; several characters dissolve into particles; recurring fantasy violence involving freezing or striking magic spells; creepy stop-motion, supersize monsters; sorcerers with creepy masks.

Sex

A man kisses a woman; a few scenes of sensual belly dancing.

Language
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

A man swigs from a bottle implied to be booze.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Sinbad: The Fifth Voyage is a sci-fi/fantasy take on Arabian Nights that is a purposely campy homage to films such as Clash of the Titans, with old-school visual effects, giant monsters, and stop-motion animation. It features recurring, mostly very cartoonish fantasy-style violence, sword-fighting, magic spells, and battles with big creatures. There are a couple of brief scenes of belly dancing. The movie is too intense for younger kids, but for teens interested in B-movie heroics and retro-style adventure, this is largely good, clean fun with hilarious effects. Other kids are likely to feel it's dated and silly.

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What's the story?

The sultan's daughter has been stolen by a sorcerer, and it's up to Sinbad (Shahin Sean Solimon) to bring her home safely. To do so, he must travel dangerous lava-laden desert terrain, battle creatures of stone and mythical proportion, and face the ultimate tests of his courage and heroism. Patrick Stewart narrates.

Is it any good?

Without an appreciation for cheesy old adventure movies, it might be hard to see why this low-budget, comically awkward film with giant stop-motion monsters is a fun watch. But those who think fondly of Clash of the Titans and other Ray Harryhausen-directed films will enjoy this retro approach to fantasy adventure. By taking out the modern sense of gore and reducing it to magic spells, dissolving villains, and the tiniest bit of bloodshed, you're able to focus more on the story, the adventure, and the heroism that makes adventure movies fun. 

Here, there may be a bit more style than substance, but it's a valiant effort. Best for teens who could appreciate a modern take on a long-gone genre. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the film's throwback style. Have you seen other movies that look like this? What do you think the director was trying to accomplish? Did he pull it off?

  • How do the monsters look in this film compared to the villains of today? How are they different?

  • How does the violence compare to films today? How does it affect the film's overall story and feel?

Movie details

Themes & Topics

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