Sniper: Ultimate Kill

Movie review by
Barbara Shulgas..., Common Sense Media
Sniper: Ultimate Kill Movie Poster Image
U.S. agents capture drug lord; graphic violence, sex.
  • R
  • 2017
  • 90 minutes

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

"You can't have any emotion" to be a sniper. "This is way north of high risk." "Days behind us determine the days ahead." "When you go to the party, there's always risks."

Positive Role Models & Representations

The bad guys are ruthless killers. The good guys also kill lots of people, for presumably better reasons.

Violence

A Marine puts out his uniform, drinks beer, and brings a gun to his mouth. A shot is heard but no blood is seen. Many people are shot as a drug lord and his men are chased. Dead bodies are seen. Some blood is seen. A man is shot in the head from behind while he's in his bathtub.  Blood gets on the nude woman in the tub with him. A sniper has his gang hang a priest from a rope in the hope that good guys will come out of hiding to help get the victim down. Instead, Brandon shoots the rope, and the priest comes down alive. The sniper immediately shoots him to death. Gang members threaten an unarmed woman, one putting his hands on her buttocks, another putting his hand on her breast.

Sex

A nude woman gets into a tub with a man, whose body is covered by the water. A nude woman is seen having sex for several seconds with a nude man. Her buttocks and breasts are seen.

Language

"F--k," "s--t," "bastard," "bitch," "puta," and "piss."  

Consumerism

This is the seventh installment in Sony's "Sniper" series.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

The team tries to capture a dangerous drug lord in Bogota.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Sniper: Ultimate Kill is the seventh in Sony Pictures' Sniper series. This time the grown son of the original sniper (played by Tom Berenger) is sent on a mission to Bogota, Colombia, to hunt down a murderous gang sniper and his drug lord boss. Full-frontal female nudity is seen, and a man and woman are shown having sex. A man's head is shot off, and action sequences feature gun battles with many casualties and blood. A sniper has his gang hang a priest from a rope in the hope that good guys will come out of hiding to help get the victim down. Instead, the main character shoots the rope, and the priest comes down alive. The sniper immediately shoots him to death. Gang members threaten an unarmed woman, one putting his hands on her buttocks, another putting his hand on her breast. A Marine is shown putting a gun in his mouth. His suicide is discussed at his funeral. Expect to hear "f--k," "s--t" and "bastard."

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What's the story?

In SNIPER: ULTIMATE KILL Brandon (Chad Michael Collins) is a Marine sergeant and trained sniper with more than 60 kills who's recruited by his retired sniper dad's old friend and CIA colleague, Richard Miller (Billy Zane), to help kill or capture a dangerous drug kingpin in Bogota, Colombia. In Bogota, Marine Kate Estrada (Danay Garcia) has been working with a U.S. Homeland Security agent (Joe Lando) and the CIA to take the bad guy, Morales (Juan Sebastian Caleros), down. Brandon joins her task force and immediately their operations start going wrong. Intel sends them and a dozen armed troops to a safe house where Morales is supposed to be staying, but the house is empty and rigged with explosives to kill the Marines. A sniper is waiting outside to pick off survivors. Many are wounded and die. Other leads Kate and Brandon pursue are also compromised, leading the team to believe there is an American mole helping Morales. A priest informant is killed, forcing Kate and Brandon to go off the grid, looking for the sniper, the drug lord, and the mole. Morales is caught but his extradition to a Miami federal court leads to more shooting and sabotages.

Is it any good?

This movie is as generic and originality-free as its name would suggest. The plot is fill-in-the-blank simple all the way, but the true test of Sniper: Ultimate Kill's banality and ineptitude is in its attempts to humanize its rather robotic characters. A Marine sniper with 67 kills commits suicide, but this development isn't integrated into the plot in any meaningful way that would merit its inclusion. Another Marine sniper is assigned to a confidential operation run by his father, and although some tension between them is suggested, the reason for that tension is neither explored nor brought to bear on the substance of the action. Only devotees of the previous Sniper films, originated with Berenger playing the sniper, will understand all the history. Fans of shoot-'em-ups may be satisfied with the blood, action, and guns, but there's nothing else here of value.  

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about what might be satisfying about movies in which bad guys get beaten by presumably good guys. The hero of Sniper: Ultimate Kill is a sniper with more than 60 "kills." The criminals he's hunting down have also killed lots of people. How does the movie encourage us to side with one killer against the other?

  • The movie mimics plots of many other movies you may have seen. Can you name some? Does its lack of originality detract from your enjoyment? Why or why not?

  • Does the violence in this movie seem necessary or gratuitous? Why?

Movie details

For kids who love action

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