Stuart Little 3: Call of the Wild

Movie review by
Nancy Davis Kho, Common Sense Media
Stuart Little 3: Call of the Wild Movie Poster Image
Mouse tale offers great role models, lackluster animation.
  • G
  • 2006
  • 105 minutes

Parents say

age 6+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 4+
Based on 4 reviews

We think this movie stands out for:

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Stuart makes friends with a skunk named Reeko; both are misfits in their respective worlds, but they start to bond and create a deep friendship as Stuart begins to be accepted for who he is at the summer camp and Reeko starts to be accepted for who he is out in the wild. Themes of friendship, acceptance, and perseverance. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Great acts of bravery and friendship by an otherwise small and vulnerable character. Loving family depicted with humor and heart. A character who lies changes his ways and wins friends as a result. 

Violence & Scariness

Scenes of mild peril for wild animals and also for Stuart. A mysterious forest beast may be slightly scary to very young kids.

Sexy Stuff

Very tame first inklings of tween romance between a boy and girl at summer camp. 

Language

Stuart is called names like "loser" by other kids at the summer camp. Some potty humor; animals falling into toilets, talk of having flatulence. A skunk says, "Talk to the butt." A cat makes reference to licking itself. 

Consumerism

Quick shout-outs for animal products manufacturer Hartz and the Animal Planet channel. 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Stuart Little 3: Call of the Wild is a 2005 direct-to-video animated movie. There's talk of a mysterious forest beast that, when it finally does appear, may be slightly scary to very young kids. A character sneaks away from his scouting group repeatedly. One character bribes another, trading food for friendship. Kids at the summer camp verbally taunt Stuart, calling him a "loser." There's some bathroom humor involving bird excrement, flatulence, and animals falling into toilets. A skunk says, "Talk to the butt." A cat says, "I lick myself." Some peril: for Stuart as he nearly drowns while being pulled in the water by a fish, and for animals in the wild trying to avoid being captured by the aforementioned beast. Also, the overall quality has dropped considerably compared to the previous two Stuart Little movies; a relatively cheap animation style is used rather than the mix of live action and CGI in the others. 

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byrockmonster January 23, 2010

not that great

not that great... not as good as the live action ones... i didn't really enjoy it but some people might. don't expect much of this.
Teen, 13 years old Written bySomeoneYouDon'tKnow July 25, 2012

Lackluster and unimaginative

Stuart Little 3 is not nearly as good as the other films. There is no need for the animation, and the story feels like it's only aimed at very young kids.... Continue reading
Kid, 9 years old August 9, 2011

The beast would frighten.

The beast would frighten my 10 month old brother.

What's the story?

Unlike the first two live-action films in the Stuart Little series based on the classic book by E.B. White, STUART LITTLE 3: CALL OF THE WILD is a direct-to-DVD animated movie. In this installment, Stuart (voiced again by Michael J. Fox) and the rest of the Little family are off to spend the summer at a rustic lake house, and Stuart is excited to become a woodsman courtesy of the Lake Scouts summer program. Rumors of a mysterious beast circulate through both the camper and the wild animal community. When the family's city cat Snowball (Nathan Lane) meets the beast, it's time for Stuart and his new friends to come to the rescue.

Is it any good?

Lacking the live-action energy of the first two films, Stuart Little 3 still manages to entertain. This is due mainly to the eternal appeal of a family who loves their mouse son just as much as their human children. Stuart, too, is a great hero for children, small but able to leap great obstacles through ingenuity and perseverance. The characters are voiced by the same actors who appeared in the earlier films, maintaining continuity even if the animation doesn't break any new artistic ground.

There's plenty of comic relief too, from the perpetually disdainful Snowball to smooth-talking but shady skunk Reeko (Wayne Brady). Parents won't find this a terribly entertaining movie, but they can rest assured that it's fine to share with the 5 and up crowd.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about what you should do if you ever get lost from your family or friends -- whether it's in the forest or in a more urban setting. Stuart takes some chances by sneaking away; what do you think of his behavior?

  • How does the friendship between Stuart and Reeko change and get better during the movie? What do they do and how do they behave when it's obvious that they haven't yet "fit in" with those around them? 

  • What does the movie teach about enjoying nature and living in the moment instead of playing video games and staring at screens all day? 

Movie details

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