The Bachelor

Movie review by
Kate Pluta, Common Sense Media
The Bachelor Movie Poster Image
Unbelievable plot and stale stereotypes.
  • PG-13
  • 2001
  • 101 minutes

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

In general, women are portrayed as marriage-hungry robbers of men's freedom, and men are portrayed as commitment-fearing wild animals who enjoy drifting from one woman to another. Some sex-related humor.

Violence
Sex

Jimmie's grandfather tells Jimmie to procreate quickly because marriages sour over time. One ex-girlfriend remembers how they "screwed a couple times." Female genitals are compared to flowers. Anne's parents are quite affectionate with one another. When she discovers she won't be marrying Jimmie, one bride candidate proclaims "Thank God I'm bisexual."

Language

Occasional moderate to extreme profanity.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Smoking and drinking.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that in general, this film portrays women as marriage-hungry robbers of men's freedom, and men are portrayed as commitment-fearing wild animals who enjoy drifting from one woman to another. Parents may want to discuss these stereotypes with their teens.

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What's the story?

In THE BACHELOR, grandson Jimmie (Chris O'Donnell) learns that he's inherited millions from his grandfather. But he won't get the money unless he is married before he turns 30 years old, which is just a day away. His girlfriend (Renee Zellweger) doesn't want to rush things, and every other girl he asks turns him down. So, Jimmie's pal places an ad in the newspaper, and the response is overwhelming.

Is it any good?

Thanks to the comedic talents of the actors, The Bachelor is humorous and entertaining, at first. Unfortunately, the jokes become cliché, and the plot becomes a bit unbelievable. It's admirable that Jimmie decides not to tell his true love about the inheritance when he proposes to her. He even lets her leave the country, accepting the fact that he'll forgo the money if she won't marry him. But when he learns that marriage is necessary to save the family company, it seems that he'd then focus his efforts on traveling to Greece to pursue his true love. Would he really consider marrying and having kids with someone he doesn't love when he could possibly marry the woman of his dreams?

Viewers willing to overlook the movie's far-fetched circumstances may still enjoy the acting of performers such as Chris O'Donnell, Renee Zellweger, Peter Ustinov, Edward Asner, Hal Holbrook, James Cromwell, Artie Lange, and Brooke Shields, who manage to entertain despite a weak script. The movie has its share of hilarious moments, and true romance eventually outweighs bachelor cynicism.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the lack of realism in comedies like this one. Why do you think many comedies are based on things that would never really happen?

Movie details

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