The Dukes of Hazzard: The Beginning

Movie review by
Heather Boerner, Common Sense Media
The Dukes of Hazzard: The Beginning Movie Poster Image
Sexist TV prequel is much raunchier than the show.
  • NR
  • 2007
  • 95 minutes

Parents say

age 13+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

age 13+
Based on 4 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Daisy's sexy transformation teaches girls that they can get what they want if they're thin enough, pretty enough, and scantily clad -- not because they're smart or interesting or talented. The narrator jokes that kids hotwire cars. There's a lot of speeding, running people off the road and sidewalk, and through school halls. Bo and Luke kidnap Boss Hogg.

Violence

Lots of comic violence, car chases and car crashes, but no one gets hurt. Bo gets tazered. Luke blows up a portable toilet to get a girl's attention. Luke jumps in a lake and nearly dies, but is rescued by Cooter. Boss Hogg pulls a gun on Luke and Bo hits Hogg in the head, knocking him unconscious.

Sex

Some nudity when Bo and Luke race through a women's locker room and later run across women sunbathing. Lots of sexual innuendo and derogatory comments about women. Women are occasionally called "crack whores," "psychic whore," "pieces of sex pie," etc. Daisy morphs from a normal looking teenage girl to a scantily clad sex object. Daisy takes a virginity pledge. Bo and Luke say that Daisy, pre-makeover, looks like "a lady golfer who swoons lady bikers." Luke is a virgin and constantly teased about it. Several mentions of sexually transmitted infections, like chlamydia and syphilis. The "Hogettes" dress in gold lamee bikinis even though everyone else if fully dressed. Boss Hogg's wife Lulu is portrayed as a sex addict who must have Luke. Daisy and Hughie make out and it's implied that they do "everything but." Bo and Luke hook up with sisters Ally and Brooke Handy, who are known for doing everything. The narrator says that Luke loses his virginity to Ally, but only kissing is shown. Bo kisses Brooke.

Language

A little salty language, including "whore," "s--t," "hell," "son of a bitch," "damn," and "jackass."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Bo and Luke get drunk on moonshine, and the whole show centers around saving Uncle Jessie's illegal moonshine operation. Jessie gives an elderly man moonshine, calling it his "medication."

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this comedy has all the raunch of the American Pie movies and all the sexism of There's Something About Mary. It encourages girls to base their worth on how they look and how they can use their appearance to manipulate men. It also may lead teen boys to want to drive recklessly. The film also says that General Robert E. Lee, who lead the South in the Civil War, was "the greatest general," which may disturb families of color. The film shows teens drinking and implies that teens have sex. While there's considerable violence, it's so comic it's hard to take seriously.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byherestony2 April 9, 2008

The Boys were Hazzardous and Daisy was off the chain!

Jonathan Bennett and Randy Wayne were merely ok in the roles of Bo and Luke. Just a little bit too dizzy for my liking. Willie Nelson and Christopher O'D... Continue reading
Adult Written byoaklandgal83 April 9, 2008

A must see

My husband and I wathed this with a couple of friends and had a blast!!!!!
Teen, 14 years old Written byFridaythe13th June 25, 2009
It is a good movie, i don't know why the movie is R it doesn't have anything expect for one second of nudity, but it's mild. The Unrated version... Continue reading
Kid, 8 years old April 9, 2008

What's the story?

In THE DUKES OF HAZZARD: THE BEGINNING, delinquent teenagers Bo and Luke Duke (Randy Wayne and Jonathan Bennett, respectively) are sent to their Uncle Jessie's (Willie Nelson) farm for rehabilitation. As soon as they get there, Jessie's old moonshine running buddy and current county selectman Boss Hogg (Christopher McDonald) puts the screws to Jessie. If Jessie can't come up with his mortgage in a few days, the county will foreclose on his loan, taking his farm. The only way to make the money is for Bo and Luke to soup up a water-logged Charger and run moonshine across the countryside. Meanwhile, smart, sensitive, and bookish Daisy Duke (Maxim model April Scott) discovers that to be taken seriously in Hazzard County, she needs to wear "daisy dukes" (short shorts) and a tight shirt that shows her cleavage.

Is it any good?

This ABC Family resurrection of the old t-and-a-and-car-crash staple The Dukes of Hazzard is just as raunchy, sexist, and titillating as you might expect. It serves up lots of eye-candy along with erroneous messages about body image and teen relationships.

Viewers may be alarmed at how emaciated Daisy looks. She's just one of several women who are judged for their appearance and sexual availability. An older woman at a carnival who expresses interest in Luke is called a "psychic whore." In short, this is the kind of movie that casts a former Real World cast member (Treshelle Cannatella) as Luke's love interest.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how women are depicted here. Parents may want to ask girls how they feel when they're dressed sexy and explain the complicated feelings that many women have when they receive sexual attention, ranging from delight to fear to self-consciousness. How do you feel comfortable dressing? What kinds of clothes would you not feel comfortable in and why? Do you have mixed feelings about how you want to dress and be seen by others? It's also a good opportunity to talk to boys about how they treat girls. Is a girl's appearance all that matters? What do you look for in a girlfriend? How do you think girls were portrayed in the video?

Movie details

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate