The Frog Prince

Movie review by
Renee Schonfeld, Common Sense Media
The Frog Prince Movie Poster Image
Low-budget musical fairy-tale adaptation with a mean sister.
  • G
  • 1986
  • 95 minutes

Parents say

age 8+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Educational Value

Meant to entertain, not inform.

Positive Messages

Reaffirms the value of keeping promises. "Once you give your word, you can't erase it" and "The best you have to give is your honor." Also shows that friendship is far more important than personal gain. Reinforces the idea that you can't judge a book by its cover (and there might be a prince under all that frog).

Positive Role Models & Representations

The young Zora is generous, loyal, courageous, and has a strong sense of right and wrong. Though she seems to be victimized by her selfish, conniving older sister, Zora's refusal to give up sees her through. Zora's uncle (her surrogate parent) seems foolish and gullible, but behaves courageously in the end. The character who first appears as a frog proves that individuals aren't always what they seem to be; he's ultimately revealed to be a worthy and important friend.

Violence & Scariness

A very large frog startles the heroine when he jumps out of the water. One of the heroes is captured, thrown into a hole, and threatened with death. Trying to save her friend, Zora runs through a dark, windy forest with scary music and frightening noises.

Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that The Frog Prince is a harmless, but charmless adaptation of an old tale which actually bears little resemblance to the traditional story. There are a few mildly suspenseful moments, and the Frog with his perpetual wide, gleeful grin and green coloring could be scary for very young or sensitive kids.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of an infant and 1 year old Written byMommaOfTwoo November 21, 2012

no thanks.

This movie is a bland version of the story. It, in fact, doesn't really follow the Frog Prince tale as it should. Skip this one.

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What's the story?

The Kingdom of Tartonia awaits a visit from an important baron who will determine which of the king's adopted nieces is the "real princess" and heiress to the throne. Twelve-year-old Zora (Aileen Quinn) is lonely, self-conscious, and in desperate need of approval. Her beautiful, but mean, older sister Henrietta (a young Helen Hunt) is out to undermine Zora in every way. When a lively, human-sized frog (John Paragon) becomes Zora's unlikely friend, everything changes. Henrietta steps up her wicked quest to win the baron's favor and Zora, with her slimy new ally, begins to find the courage and self-confidence she never knew she had.

Is it any good?

This passable film is one in a series of low-budget fairy tales made in the 1980s by Cannon Films. All of the movies can be identified by their shoddy production values, poor acting, and forgettable, derivative musical numbers. THE FROG PRINCE is actually one of the better entries in the group because of an engaging performance by John Paragon as Ribbit, the Frog.

Still, the characters are one-dimensional; the story is silly, predictable and unrelated to the traditional tale; and there's very little wit or charm to be found.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about Henrietta as a bully. How did Zora deal with her sister? What finally made Zora effective? What are some things a person can do to stop bullying (including cyberbullying)?

  • The Baron had to decide which of the two sisters was a real princess. What qualities was he looking for? What qualities make someone special?

Movie details

Themes & Topics

Browse titles with similar subject matter.

For kids who love musicals

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