The Girl Next Door

Movie review by
Nell Minow, Common Sense Media
The Girl Next Door Movie Poster Image
Stunningly bad teen sex comedy.
  • R
  • 2004
  • 108 minutes

Parents say

age 14+
Based on 13 reviews

Kids say

age 13+
Based on 7 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Violence

Tense situations, some fighting.

Sex

Very explicit sexual situations and references, porn stars, strip club.

Language

Very strong language.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Underage character drinks, smokes a cigar, and takes Ecstasy.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this movie has explicit sexual references and situations. Many of the main characters work in the pornography industry. While the glimpses of porn video footage are brief and more suggestive than explicit, there are some graphic images and there is a lot of vulgar humor. Characters go to a strip club and get lap dances. Characters also drink and smoke, and a character's inadvertent use of the drug Ecstasy is portrayed as humorous. There is some violence, including fights, and characters use very strong language. Parents should also be aware that they may find the overall themes of the movie inappropriate even for older teens, including the idea of the porn star as a fantasy romantic figure.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bytwilightkilla April 9, 2008
Adult Written byjoeybombotz April 9, 2008

WoW

this is just a great movie
Teen, 15 years old Written byCyonnara May 10, 2010
This movie was probably the most terrifying movies I have ever seen, but in a good was I thought this was very well done and made it look like the video game wh... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written byagnesb February 22, 2015

Stop!

Im 14. I Saw this in School, because om of the guys wanted too. And us girls thouged 'okay we'll See it because we did'nt knew what it was about.... Continue reading

What's the story?

In THE GIRL NEXT DOOR, good boy Matthew (Emile Hirsch) is just about to get everything he's been working for. He's on the verge of getting a scholarship to Georgetown and he's raised $25,000 to bring a brilliant student to America to study. Then one night he sees a gorgeous girl (Elisha Cuthbert) in the house next door, getting undressed. She sees him peeping and comes over -- she is house-sitting. They go for a ride and she asks him when the last time was that he did something crazy. The next thing he knows, he's standing naked in the street as she drives away. And soon after that, he and Danielle are up to mischief. All is dewy young love in soft focus until he finds out that she's a porn star. He is disappointed in her. She is disappointed in him because he is disappointed in her. Danielle goes back to her porn producer. Matthew goes after her. Kelly goes after him. The $25,000 disappears. Snobbish bullies must be shown up. And there is still that speech he has to give to win that scholarship.

Is it any good?

This movie's overall themes are truly vile. Many films present prostitutes as the romantic ideal, but whether the movie is a silly comedy (Trading Places), a romantic comedy (Pretty Woman), a comedy with literary allusions (Mighty Aphrodite), or even a drama (Leaving Las Vegas and Klute), there is something uncomfortably misogynistic about these heroines. They always seem to be impossible fantasy figures, eternally available and unshockable yet somehow ineradicably pure, and, perhaps the ultimate fantasy, having experienced many men but preferring our leading man.

In the most cynical manner, this movie smugly attempts to have it both ways. It wants us to be titillated by Danielle's past and yet root for her innocent romance. It wants us to assume that she is both hooker and angel. The ultimate conclusion is all the more smarmy for trying not to be. The main actors give decent performances and there are a few moments of comedy, a better-than-average soundtrack, and even a little charm. But the last third of the plot is both vile and stupid.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about what Matthew and Danielle see in each other and what the prospects for their future relationship are likely to be.

Movie details

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