The Holland Avenue Boys: A Success Story

Movie review by
Nell Minow, Common Sense Media
The Holland Avenue Boys: A Success Story Movie Poster Image
An inspiring documentary for the whole family.
  • NR
  • 1998
  • 57 minutes

Parents say

age 11+
Based on 1 review

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Violence

Some sad moments.

Sex
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this is an inspiring documentary to share with the family.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bymusicmem July 29, 2011

Heartwarming and Motivational

A RARE, uplifting, motivational and educational film. Recommended for all ages.

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What's the story?

The "Holland Avenue Boys" are 14 men who grew up on or near Holland Avenue in the Bronx in the late 1940's and early 1950's. This documentary begins with memories of growing up, endless games of stickball and piling on top of each other. Though they went in many different directions professionally and geographically, they maintained close ties. The 12 surviving boys and family members all speak candidly about their lives. One speaks frankly about grappling with depression, another talks about his divorce and his pride in maintaining a loving relationship with the mother of his children. One talks about how he feels about not having had children. Another explains that he dreamed of being an engineer until a school guidance counselor told him that he would never get a job because he was Jewish. One became a distinguished physicist, one a doctor, one a manufacturer. One ran a museum of jazz. One flew missions in Viet Nam and then lived in Morocco helping to set up air defense systems. Through it all, they made many friends and they loved their families, but the connection between the members of the original group remained important to each of them.

Is it any good?

This engaging film was made by one of the boys with financial support from some of the others; the "success story" is their enduring friendship and loyalty. With busy working-class parents, some immigrant, they spent most of their time together growing up and raised each other as much as their families did. Indeed, they were a warm and loving family for each other, and they remain that way with annual reunions and with an unbreakable connection of trust and loyalty.

The "success story" gives the "boys" so much pleasure and support that one of the wives says, "My only regret is that I am not one of the Holland Avenue Boys." Their trust and affection for the member of the group who made the movie shows as they tell the camera about their successes and failures at home and at work.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how they define success. Who are the people they feel they could call to ask for anything they needed and get whatever it was without a question? Who feels that way about them? What does it take to sustain a friendship for half a century? It can be especially useful for children to see how important it is to these men to be in touch with people who share their childhood memories. Would you like to be one of the "Holland Avenue boys?" What do you need to do to make sure that the friends you have now stick together that way and for that long?

Movie details

For kids who love true stories

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