The Insider

Movie review by
Nell Minow, Common Sense Media
The Insider Movie Poster Image
Fascinating whistleblower story for older teens.
  • R
  • 1999
  • 157 minutes

Parents say

age 11+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 12+
Based on 3 reviews

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Violence

Brief shot of dead body; characters in peril.

Sex
Language

Strong and frequent.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Some drinking and smoking.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this movie has tense scenes, strong language, smoking, and some drinking.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byBebB December 1, 2018

Doesn't have anything a 12yo couldn't watch really

There are tense moments,strong language and some death threats.Not really scary just tense.It's a really good film and Russell and Al Pacino are great in i... Continue reading
Teen, 15 years old Written byAddiec1423 January 28, 2021
Teen, 13 years old Written by1shielsm isb.be. December 23, 2020

the insider

I did not want to watch this film, but when I watched it I found it to be very good. For parents, this film is about a cigarette company that makes their cigare... Continue reading

What's the story?

In THE INSIDER, Jeffrey Wigand (Russell Crowe), a research scientist for a tobacco company, tells 60 Minutes that the company is more aware of the addictive properties of nicotine than its executives claimed and in fact manipulated the delivery of nicotine. Show producer Lowell Bergman (Al Pacino) promises to protect him. But executives cut Wigand's portion from the broadcast because they're worried about a lawsuit by the tobacco company. Wigand and Bergman are caught in parallel moral dilemmas. Both are loyal to their organizations until they witness what they perceive as acts of corruption. Both respond by making their stories public, resulting in struggle and sacrifice. The question is not one of disloyalty, but of conflicting loyalties. Wigand knows that telling the truth will hurt him and his family more than it hurts the tobacco company.

Is it any good?

Director/co-screenwriter Michael Mann very skillfully makes every shot and every note of the soundtrack help shape the story so that the viewer sees Bergman's perspective. (One hint: the Bergman character is unerringly fair and honest.) Families should be sure to discuss the point of view of the movie, and how it would differ if it was told from Wigand's, Wallace's, or the tobacco company's point of view.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the point of view of the movie. Director/co-screenwriter Michael Mann very skillfully makes every shot and every note of the soundtrack help shape the story so that the viewer sees Bergman's perspective. (One hint: the Bergman character is unerringly fair and honest.) Families could also discuss how the movie would be different if it was told from Wigand's, Wallace's, or the tobacco company's point of view.

Movie details

Our editors recommend

For kids who love thrills

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