The Lion Guard: The Rise of Scar

Movie review by
Renee Schonfeld, Common Sense Media
The Lion Guard: The Rise of Scar Movie Poster Image
More adventures of Kion and his Guard; cartoon peril.
  • NR
  • 2018
  • 141 minutes

Parents say

age 5+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 5+
Based on 1 review

We think this movie stands out for:

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Educational Value

Provides information about traits, patterns, and specific roles among animals in Africa (e.g., elephants find water during the dry season).

Positive Messages

Stresses "The Circle of Life" and interdependence of creatures in the wild. In a humorous way, looks at animals that survive by preying upon other animals. Values "listening" as a significant tool.

Violence & Scariness

Cartoon violence throughout: predators chasing other creatures, the capture of a beloved young lion, a volcanic eruption. Fang-baring hyenas are frequently villainous. 

Sexy Stuff
Language

Villains often intimidate and threaten the animals with death.

Consumerism

Part of the Disney Lion King franchise. A new line of "Rise of Scar" toys has been introduced with the release of this movie.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that The Lion Guard: The Rise of Scar is a "movie" that consists of the title story, which is one extended episode from the TV series The Lion Guard (Episode 5, Season 2), and four episodes from Season 1 ("The Trouble With Galagos," Episode 16; "Janja's New Crew," Episode 17; "Four Baboons," Episode 18; and "Lions of the Outland," Episode 20). In all of them, Kion, son of Simba and Nala, grandson of Mufasa, is the leader of the prestigious Lion Guard, an assortment of lovable and skillful animal characters that protects the Pride Lands. Kion has the remarkable power of "The Roar of the Elders," which enables the Guard's leader to connect with the brave lions of the past. Each story echoes "The Circle of Life" premise of the original movie, and includes significant messages about responsibility, inclusion, teamwork, and the enduring grace and symmetry of nature. Caution: For little kids who are not yet able to discern imaginary from real, there's peril and mild action throughout. Villains, all members of the animal kingdom, are predatory, conniving, or envious. They chase, bare scary teeth, and menace all of the heroes and innocents in their quest for either food or power. Viewers can expect quality all around in keeping with the high standards of the Lion King franchise. The Disney Company has also released new toys related specifically to "The Rise of Scar" episode.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byLousie M. August 13, 2018

The Lion Guard: The Rise of Scar Parent guide

Violence and peril and some threats about deaths.
Teen, 17 years old Written byJoshSeville1 April 3, 2018

i really love the lion guard

The lion guard is really awesome i love the show the lion guard i plan to try to audition to be in this show as a charecter i plan to want to be able to bring m... Continue reading

What's the story?

In the longer, featured title story in THE LION GUARD: THE RISE OF SCAR -- a compilation of five episodes from Seasons 1 and 2 of The Lion Guard television series -- it's the dry season in the Pride Lands. The heat and lack of water and food threaten survival. It's up to Ma Tembo (voiced by Lynette Dupree), matriarch of the elephants, to lead all the creatures to a new water source. Janja (Andrew Kishino) and his laughing hyena sidekicks are impatient, and they menace the lions and anyone else they think would make a good meal. Young lion leader Kion (Max Charles) and his loyal guards step up and protect them all. At the same time, Rafiki (Khary Payton) introduces a new apprentice, Makini (Landry Bender), an inexperienced female mandrill who will follow him as The Knowledge Keeper. As Makini learns the responsibilities of her future role, Ushari, the snake (Christian Slater), teams up with Janja to manipulate her and her mystical Bakora staff. They hope to reach out to the mighty elephants of the past, as Kion does, using his control of The Roar, a gift that only he has been granted. Ushari and Janja are determined to resurrect Scar, the most dangerously evil lion of all.  And that might prove to be a calamity that only future episodes of the show can deal with.

Is it any good?

If audiences don't mind the fact that this "movie" is a compilation of episodes earlier broadcast on The Lion Guard TV series, it's a treat for kids and fans of the popular Lion King franchise. The characters are, as always, well-defined and funny, and often deliver sound and significant messages to young audiences. The original songs are bright and catchy. The performances in The Lion Guard: The Rise of Scar are all strong; the story is intriguing; the animation is first-rate. Still, despite the well-earned acclaim of this Disney entry, it's not appropriate for little ones who are not yet able to distinguish real from pretend. Beloved characters are often in danger, villains are noisy and threatening, and action is plentiful.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can discuss the fact that studios, especially those marketing products for kids, choose to build their DVD inventory with compilations of episodes from television programs. What are your thoughts about this corporate concept? Did you know that The Lion Guard: The Rise of Scar was a collection of previously aired segments?  

  • What do you think is meant by the statement: "The hardest part of listening is finding the quiet to hear." How did the story demonstrate this concept?

  • Do you know the meaning of the film term "cliffhanger"? In what way is the ending of the Rise of Scar tale a cliffhanger? What do film companies gain by ending their movies this way?

  • What character strengths and skills are emphasized in this movie? What did Makini learn by the end of the Scar story?

Movie details

Character Strengths

Find more movies that help kids build character.

Themes & Topics

Browse titles with similar subject matter.

For kids who love Disney

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate