The Losers

Movie review by
Jeffrey M. Anderson, Common Sense Media
The Losers Movie Poster Image
Violent but quirky movie aimed at teen comic book fans.
  • PG-13
  • 2010
  • 98 minutes

Parents say

age 15+
Based on 6 reviews

Kids say

age 12+
Based on 7 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive messages

Though there are some examples of triumphing over the odds and teamwork, the violence of the movie is constant and lighthearted -- sending some unrealistic and potentially confusing messages about weapons and violence.

Positive role models & representations

Though some of the team members keep dangerous secrets from one another and occasionally hurt one another physically, for the most part the team's trust for one another is commendable. Clay, the leader, acts partly out of revenge, but he very clearly has a humanitarian side too. He races into intense danger to rescue some children, and puts the welfare of his men before his own mission.

Violence

The movie is filled with extreme comic book violence, including fistfights, kung fu fights, shootouts, knife fights, bullet wounds, blood spurts, dead bodies, and giant explosions. (One explosion is more like an implosion that wipes an entire island off the earth.) The villain is an unscrupulous arms dealer who is looking for the latest destructive technology -- "snukes" -- to sell to the highest bidder. Most notably, the bad guy blows up a helicopter filled with kids (only seen from the outside). There are also brief images of a cockfight (a gory gambling event in which two roosters are placed in a ring and made to fight one another to the death).

Sex

Two main characters have sex; the scene shows them kissing and removing clothes in a glossy, slow-motion scene, and then lying together under the covers afterward, but no nudity and nothing explicit. Zoe Saldana wears a series of very sexy outfits. Several women in bikinis appear as "window dressing" and/or playthings for certain characters. One character wears a suggestive t-shirt depicting a woman eating a hot dog. Chris Evans changes clothes in an elevator and is caught by four women, who gaze at him approvingly. We also see a shadow puppet play of two godzillas having sex.

Language

"F--k" is heard once, and "s--t" is used several times, though language in general is fairly infrequent. Other words include: "hell," "Oh my God," "anal," "balls," "dick," "ass," "son of a bitch," and "Goddamn it."

Consumerism

A helicopter crashes into a huge Dunkin' Donuts sign.

Drinking, drugs & smoking

Clay and Aisha drink in a bar, including downing a shot of tequila in one gulp. Aisha brings a bottle of liquor to Clay's room, but they don't drink it. Later, characters open a bottle of champagne and drink.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this often funny action movie -- based on a comic book series from 2003-06 -- is filled with comic book-style violence, with lots of guns, knives, slo-mo fight scenes, and explosions. The movie centers on a group of ex-soldiers who are betrayed and left for dead; part of their motivation is problem-solving and part is revenge. The movie features strong, but infrequent language (one use of "f--k" and several uses of "s--t"), and a non-explicit, though highly stylized sexual scene. Without any huge teen-appeal stars (aside from Avatar's Zoe Saldana), the movie will mostly appeal to die-hard comic book fans and action junkies.

User Reviews

Adult Written bystephen39 August 28, 2013

Only let your teens see this one.

For me "The losers" is one film you should only let teenagers see...and that`s despite the fact it is based on a comic strip. It is a great action fi... Continue reading
Adult Written byerica921 September 21, 2015
Kid, 10 years old July 28, 2010

The Losers

Pretty violent.
Teen, 15 years old Written byThe age judge July 30, 2016

What's the story?

After a routine mission goes terribly wrong, a five-man CIA special ops team, led by Clay (Jeffrey Dean Morgan), is left for dead in Bolivia. Worse, they have discovered that the mysterious, evil "Max" was in charge. Stranded and out of options, they choose to trust newcomer Aisha (Zoe Saldana), who promises to return them to the United States in exchange for the death of Max. The downside is that Max is very highly protected and virtually unkillable. Worse, hardly anything is as it seems, no one can be trusted, and THE LOSERS must rely on their heaviest firepower just to survive. Chris Evans, Idris Elba, Columbus Short, and Oscar Jaenada make up the rest of the team.

Is it any good?

The Losers has the brisk, breezy energy of a good "B" movie; the pace never lags, and the action -- with the help of lots of tongue-in-cheek slow-motion footage -- looks terrific. The cast is immensely likeable, and they all seem to click with one another, forming a tight-knit group whose camaraderie is infectious. It helps that the movie kicks off with the group charging into a danger zone to rescue 25 innocent kids.

Jason Patric turns in an interesting, offbeat performance as "Max," the elusive and powerful villain, relishing his terrible acts and looking forward to a world wiped clean by war weapons. To be sure, the violence in the movie is strong, and maintains a sexy undercurrent -- but it all remains securely in the comic-book realm, making it a fun, if edgy choice for teens.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the violence in this movie. Was it disturbing or thrilling? What factors contribute to making violent scenes more or less intense? Were there any scenes that upset you? Why or why not?

  • The movie contains some stereotypical images of women as "arm candy," or playthings for male characters. Why do you think the filmmakers included this element? Do you think male and female viewers will react differently to these scenes?

  • How important is teamwork to the group's success? What are the challenges and rewards of teamwork in your own life?

Movie details

For kids who love action

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate